• http://www.mobilemartin.com/ Michael Martin

    Stating Responsive Design for multinational sites would be a poor choice, in my opinion, as all the Meta information will always be in one default language while the content would respond to the language detected…which your HTML/CSS would be inclusive of all language/region variations, negatively affecting load time.

    Dynamic Serving under one URL allows DIFFERENT HTML to be provided based on language/region/device type which would have the proper language Title Tag & Meta information and only have to load that language content to save in load time.

    Curious if you actually implemented responsive design to a multinational site and its results.

  • http://uk.queryclick.com/ Chris Liversidge

    Hi Martin – yes I have implemented this on a number of multinational websites. Your point would absolutely have been valid before Google rolled out multinational hreflang tags at the start of last year.

    See this post for a top line on how you can use hreflangs to ensure the right language pages are returned in the correct countries (and the correct country version of Google – in particular! – http://searchengineland.com/can-new-multilingual-markup-create-advantages-for-big-brand-optimisation-105384

  • http://twitter.com/MaryKayLofurno Mary Kay Lofurno

    Interesting article, good points. I really like point two because I think that this is not a consideration when many e-commerce sites design their UIUX. It might be interesting for someone to do an article with examples of sites designed with this in mind vs not.

  • http://www.mobilemartin.com/ Michael Martin

    Chris,

    This is based on interpreting your statement to mean using responsive design to have ALL country/language rendering under ONE URL, meaning English US, English UK, Spanish ES, Spanish MX, etc render under SITE.com/SAMEPAGE – if so, dynamic serving is the ONLY way possible, as link href lang wouldn’t make sense since all the URLs are the same.

    If you mean that all device types, but not ALL country/languages would render under ONE URL, meaning English US is SITE.com/US and English UK is SITE.com/UK, then responsive would work…but for Mobile SEO dynamic serving is needed to change intent and different keyword targeting, if you allow me to play “article UNO” :) – http://searchengineland.com/responsive-design-alone-is-not-mobile-seo-124202

  • http://uk.queryclick.com/ Chris Liversidge

    Sure thing Martin, I’m not sure how you interpreted that all site and language URLs would need to be the same for responsive designs from the article, but that’s certainly not what I’m advocating, you can see by digging though the previous articles in my column the correct architecture choices to make there – which are totally compatible with responsive solutions for multi-device support.

  • http://uk.queryclick.com/ Chris Liversidge

    Thanks Mary – yes I agree a study would help make the case for further adoption. We have a couple of clients implementing this strategy so at some stage we’ll be able to publish the outcomes. In the meantime we can keep fingers crossed that other brands are running the strategy and are willing to be generous with their outcomes for the greater good of the industry!

  • http://www.mobilemartin.com/ Michael Martin

    Chris,

    Thank you for the clarification, as that makes sense from a multinational view :)

    Dynamic Serving, IMHO, would still give you a better edge over Responsive since you can completely change the HTML with a true customized layout, keyword intent targeting and generally save on load time.

  • http://twitter.com/jwdlatif Jawad Latif

    So we should also work on developing mobile versions of our websites.