• Craig

    Great advice. Would you ever consider putting broad match keywords into their own ad group to separate them from phrase/exact?

  • Mathijs Compeer

    Google docs dashboard is interesting. Thanks

  • Mathijs Compeer

    Google docs dashboard is interesting. Thanks

  • http://bashfoo.com/ Mike McDermott

    Wow! What a great article. Several of these tips were very much needed, specifically the broad matching algo and how that works. We have been curious as to how that was managed by other agencies and analysts and it is good to see that it is managed, “carefully”. Cheers!

  • http://bashfoo.com/ Mike McDermott

    Wow! What a great article. Several of these tips were very much needed, specifically the broad matching algo and how that works. We have been curious as to how that was managed by other agencies and analysts and it is good to see that it is managed, “carefully”. Cheers!

  • http://www.toptiertools.com/ Frederick Vallaeys

    I would put the exact match into its own ad group by itself. The broad and phrase matches would stay in another ad group. I think I’ll do a detailed post on account structure next…

  • http://www.toptiertools.com/ Frederick Vallaeys

    A few people report issues with line 593 of the AdWords dashboard script. This is the line where we pull the reports for the correct labels. So most likely if the script fails on line 593, it’s because it can’t find any items that have the right label. Be careful too that the label has been applied to the right level of the account. For example, if the label exists but it’s only been added to a campaign and you’re trying to do a dashboard for keywords, this will fail. The solution is to add the label to the keywords and then run the script again (or change the dashboard to be campaign level).

  • Alan Mitchell

    Your point that changing bids can change which keyword is served is spot on. It’s something I wrote about in detail here: http://www.searchenginepeople.com/blog/the-google-adwords-trap-chances-are-youre-paying-too-much-for-your-google-adwords-clicks.html. As you point out, raising the bid for one keyword can take impressions away from another keyword, and result in an endless cycle of keyword canibalization (the end result being higher CPCs for few extra clicks or conversions).

  • Alan Mitchell

    Keeping broad match keywords separate from exact (and phrase) match keywords can work very effectively. If you apply all your exact (and phrase) match keywords as negatives to your broad campaigns(s), your broad campaign(s) will simply act as a generator of new keywords (and new negative keywords if the generated search queries are not relevant). Here’s the technique in more detail if you’re keen to give it a go http://www.calculatemarketing.com/blog/techniques/google-adwords-broad-match-generator/.

  • http://alex-hemedinger.blogspot.com/ Alexander Hemedinger

    Yea that’s very important especially when I have to look at some real horrible structures. For example: 300 keywords in one ad group, great…..

  • http://alex-hemedinger.blogspot.com/ Alexander Hemedinger

    Yea that’s very important especially when I have to look at some real horrible structures. For example: 300 keywords in one ad group, great…..

  • http://www.toptiertools.com/ Frederick Vallaeys

    Good point Alan! Adding negatives for all our existing exact matches gets a little crazy so we only add them when we find Google is serving up one of our broad matches rather than a keyword that is an exact match to the query. We even built this into a one-click optimization in optmyzr because doing it manually is a huge time drain!