• treb072410

    Great post! Thanks for sharing very informative read!

  • treb072410

    Great post! Thanks for sharing very informative read!

  • RedLeader

    I’d like to know more about how this works, as the article doesn’t really explain it.

    Is this like the portals’ CDNs that cache the most popular sites so that users can access them faster on local hubs than connecting directly to the actual servers? Similar to Google’s SiteSpeed caching service? In this instance, the tagged sites, or elements on the page, would be cached on Bing’s CDNs for pre-rendering in the background, if that’s how it works.

    Based on the included image, it looks a little bit like the old Google Preview function that Google removed last year, which is a bit different. Of course, the image may also just be a representation of a schematic of what’s happening, but as the embedded pictures are so small and there are no links to the full-sized ones, it’s very hard to tell.

  • http://my.opera.com/rafaelluik Rafael Luik

    It’s not like Google preview, the image is just a mockup.
    This seems to be just like Google prerendering / Google Chrome “Instant Pages”:
    https://support.google.com/chrome/answer/1385029
    http://googlewebmastercentral.blogspot.com.br/2011/06/announcing-instant-pages.html

    Perhaps Microsoft’s claim it takes care to not waste a user’s bandwidth and battery life is because they prerender the page text and CSS but not images or something more technical like that.

  • RedLeader

    I think you’re on to something with the first part of the article
    talking about IE 11′s pre-render feature – that does sound very much
    like Chrome’s pre-render feature.

    The part I’m hung up on though
    is MS’s additional bit about having website users use a pre-render tag
    on their site, which would give users direct control over whether their
    site pre-renders in the SERPs or not. The current implementation on both
    Chrome and IE is a brower-based function that essentially downloads the
    page as you sit on the SERPs page, or when you are using auto complete,
    as they have a very high statistical chance of that being THE page
    you’re looking for.

    In contrast, by tagging your site with the
    tag, that’s allowing individual webmasters to pre-render their site in
    your browser, which could either be a search function, or the tag merely
    acts like a plugin trigger in the browser. This is pretty interesting.

    I
    found the mobile battery life/data limits point interesting, because
    they’re depicting a desktop browser instead of a mobile browser, and
    most people on the bleeding edge who build this into their sites will
    probably be targeting desktop first, mobile second. Then, when you
    consider that only 1 mobile OS representing less than 5% of the US
    market uses IE, Windows Phone, (and probably not even IE 11) it seems
    like a foot note announcement rather than some main benefit to tout. What an odd choice to lead their conversation with.