• http://blackbirdesolutions.com Bryan Coe

    A good gimmick, but I guess the question is what’s the ROI of sending out bars of chocolate?

  • http://twitter.com/AdamRYP Adam Thompson

    It’s a gimmick, for sure, but what makes it spammy?

  • Nick Boylan

    Bars of chocolate aren’t actually that expensive, nor is labeling them. And if the list is good and your campaign is targeted, dimensional mail like this can be very effective in starting a relationship or for engaging a sough-after lead.

    Deliver has a good list of unique examples of dimensional mail a few months ago:

    https://delivermagazine.com/2012/06/you-can-mail-that/

  • StevenLockey

    Well, its better than receiving normal junk mail thats for sure!

  • embraceinteractive

    You’re not going to know the ROI until the campaign is completed and the results are analyzed. The fact that one personalized chocolate bar lead to press coverage by a respected digital marketing journalist and a valuable link sounds pretty good to me. I like the idea.

  • Ahmed Mallah

    Smart implementation of Direct Marketing is always Welcome especially in our Overcrowded world. Such tactics really enhance Brand experience once linked to eWorld which has an exponential effect via Search Engines & Social Media (Viral Marketing)………… Bravo CMA Digital.

  • http://www.esocialmedia.com Jerry Nordstrom

    Okay same but different. Years ago I worked with a very clever and aggressive sales women in the Pharma industry. From time to time she ran into the “Good old Boys Network” problem. She would work every angle to get a meeting, but would be ignored. Then as a *last resort* she would send the decision maker an invitation which consisted of 12 premium golf balls and a note. “Just in case you didn’t have the balls to play golf with me I have booked us a tee time at xyz… Bring your A game loser pays.”

    Nothing like questioning a guy’s manhood and challenging them to a golf match.

    Many mid level execs were offended (or scared to lose), but a great deal of upper level CxO players thought that she was the kind of fiery player they wanted to work with. She was the highest grossing rep in a Global company of over 3k.

  • http://twitter.com/jmvera89 Jose Miguel Vera

    And Barry still didn’t give them a link hahahahahha

  • http://www.facebook.com/justinwalmsley.fb Justin Walmsley

    I received a personalised bar as well, Googled and viewed the page. Barry might have received the bar in a slightly different envelop to me, but here in the UK my bar came in a shiney blue envelop ensuring it was the first mail I opened.

    I think it is a great example of Direct Marketing combining both online/offline tactics. It has also managed to enter into the holly grail “earned media” category. Well done to them I say!

  • http://www.heatherphysioc.com/ Heather Physioc SEO

    Reminiscent of the good old days of being able to say, “Type this keyword into AOL!” in ads and having dibs enough on it to be the link that got the clicks. Chocolate bar = ad. Fun and interesting approach I suppose.

  • http://twitter.com/MannyGasal Manny Gasal™ ♥

    I find it very innovative and interesting. Great strategy !

  • Abdul Wahab

    Its helpful in spreading brand awareness/recognition.. toward around the world.
    by doing this they could get traffic even from those who don’t even know about this. like

    Barry shared his experience with all of us and in the result many of us searched it on google and went to cmadigital…

    nice tactics

  • Matthew Wood

    They’re missing a question mark.

  • robthespy

    To me, this seems like a great campaign for an agency who can take the idea, customize it and manage it for companies.

    The message to Barry: “Look how we’ll this works! You’re reading it such a good idea that tons of others are “stealing the idea”….it’s brilliant on many levels.

    “Who sent me cookies?”
    “Who sent me a pink speedo?”
    “Who sent me wool socks?”

    Hmmm, now what should I send to my perspectives? “Who sent me a BMW M6?” ;)

  • Amo Sokhi

    Hi Guys,

    Thank you for your positive replies and feedback on our campaign. Our primary aim was to get noticed by potential partners, clients, and of course search engine land, for which we are thankful to Barry for this post.

    Answering your question Bryan, I think Nick has pretty much summarised our
    thoughts; that an initiative of targeting particular individuals by way of
    sending a cost effective, high impact gift should (and has) result in a positive
    ROI. In terms of ROI, our targets with the campaign was not so much direct
    revenue (which is difficult to measure as leads can take months/years to
    convert), but more focused on awareness, engagement, and brand awareness. As
    Abdul has said, our analytics show traffic arriving at our site from new
    sources which we can directly attribute to the campaign, which is fantastic.

    Our next stage is to monitor our list of recipients for interactions across all channels, including online (social, brand traffic etc) and offline (calls, emails etc). This will take some time however feedback like this is invaluable and gives us a fantastic feel good feeling which is what its all about (and yes Melissa, we tested lots of chocolate bars before sending out to make sure they were delicious – feel free to get in touch to have a sample sent over).

    Amo Sokhi
    Head of Strategy
    CMA Digital

  • http://www.nathanielbailey.co.uk/ Nathaniel Bailey

    lol maybe Barry didn’t feel like giving them a link because it “felt spammy” to him? Or maybe he just didn’t want to give them a link because they where simply emailing to cry about others doing that same thing?

    No offence to CMA, I kind of see why you would be a little upset that others do this too but you example of billboards and posters etc was not very good, I’m those are advertising solutions which have been around for a very long time and used by most companies, and its the highest price or first come first served that gets the add spot, so why would google not be the same for any sort of advertising stunt/option no matter if its fresh, new or old?

    I’m not having a dig at CMA, just saying, its a dog eat dog world and you can’t expect people not to try different advertising stunts just because you feel your the first to do it :(

  • Matt Raynes

    Bet you enjoyed the chocolate!

  • Amo Sokhi

    Hey Nathaniel, definitely a dog eat dog world, hence why we
    decided to invest into making this campaign deliver the best possible ROI for us so that we can say we did our best with it (whilst we had the chance). As I wrote in my earlier comment, we wanted to get the attention of Barry and S.E.L, and thought that the issues highlighted in our message to Barry were legitimate questions, as we had asked ourselves these very questions when working through the campaign.

    As for the comparison between our campaign and billboards etc, this was merely an attempt at generating interest from Barry in order to gain a response of sorts. I guess something worked. Comparing Google with traditional advertising means, I would agree that Paid Search works in a similar fashion by way of commercial arrangement, however the organics do not (highest price or first come first served.)

    I think it natural to be somewhat precious when you have something
    good that you want to make the most use of. Feedback such as Robs (robthespy) has made us realise that our initial concerns over protection actually are not that important in the grand scheme of things, and we should focus on doing the best we can and continuing to be original and interesting as an agency. If a concept is great, maximise it and move onto the next. Doc Emmett Browns ‘flux capacitor’ moment springs to mind :-).

  • Matt Lacuesta

    I wonder how long it will take this blog post to rank higher than CMA’s page for the query.