• http://www.esocialmedia.com Jerry Nordstrom

    Take an average sized finger or larger thumb and apply it to a small mobile screen while travelling in a car, walking down a street or even sitting on the bus, results are a great deal of inadvertent clicks on PPC mobile ads.

  • http://twitter.com/ajfinken Andrew Finkenbinder

    Also, often people will scout products or services on-the-go but not want to deal with filling out forms, checkouts, and other processes on their phones. That explains some of the higher CTR relative to conversions.

  • http://www.twitter.com/juhani Juhani Polkko

    Hi! I’m wondering about the 5% figure. Google has earlier stated that they have 500,000 advertisers “using click-to-call”. This would mean that Google had 10M advertisers, but the figure I’ve heard is between 3-4 million.

    Maybe I’m comparing apples to oranges, or why this doesn’t add up?

  • http://www.cobwebseo.com/ Ajay Jhunjhunwala

    Ya, small devices are becoming more popular. People are using these devices for internet surfing. In those small devices advertising appears in a different way or place on the screen. Unfortunately these ads don’t appear as it appears in Desktop or Laptops. So advertiser should test the advertisement in small devices carefully.

  • http://www.rimmkaufman.com/ George Michie

    The observed conversion rates on phones are poor but we’re told that “Instead they convert offline or later on a PC, which are generally not tracked.” And we know that that’s happening because….Google tells us so? What if the advertiser only has an online presence? There may be spillover effects, and placing value on click to call and “get directions” for mobile search is important. However, “trust us the clicks on ads are more valuable than you can see” isn’t a terribly compelling sales pitch to me, considering the source.

  • http://twitter.com/gsterling Greg Sterling

    The later conversions are on PC or offline is based on multiple studies and data points, some of which come from Google but most of which do not. As a general matter e-commerce is 5.1% of retail (forget what Forrester says) per the US Commerce Dept. Yet 80% to 90% of internet users do research before buying in stores. That pattern extends to mobile devices, with 80% of smartphone owners (or more) saying they use their devices while shopping and in-stores, yet m-commerce penetration is roughly 20% of smartphones (give or take) in the US. Amazon and eBay are two exceptions to the general rule that people don’t do e-commerce on their phones

  • http://twitter.com/gsterling Greg Sterling

    This is a valid question and I’ll follow up.

  • http://www.rimmkaufman.com/ George Michie

    Yes, but none of those studies make the all important distinction between people who navigate to a brick and mortar store using brand search or bookmarks or direct load, and those who got to the website via a competitive non-brand search. That’s where all the money is spent, but nobody has tied that expense to material offline revenue. I’m hoping we can tie that knot, but honest research hasn’t produced compelling evidence.

  • http://twitter.com/GTM360 GTM360

    Agreed! In addition, we’ve noticed that, due to the different color schemes used on SERPs, paid search results don’t appear as different on mobile than on desktop, thus driving some more inadvertent clicks on mobile PPC ads.

  • http://twitter.com/GTM360 GTM360

    The 500K figure probably refers to advertisers who use “click-to-call” on desktop search – as many do – and not just mobile. For those wondering how “click-to-call” makes sense on desktop, just think of Skype installed on the desktop.

  • http://www.esocialmedia.com Jerry Nordstrom

    That’s a very good point GTM. We have seen very high CTR with very low conversion rates, compared to any other form of paid advertising…. and we’re not newbies. My feeling is that the general rule is the smaller the device the less visitors intent is to search, filter and find a new service as it is simply to connect with a service they are already connected with. In this sense the PPC mobile ad becomes a charge paid by the company for mobile users to call 411.

  • http://twitter.com/GraphicMail GraphicMail

    I fully agree with this sentiment – we can tell from experience that our differentiated strategies for mobile phones and tablets – for search and lead generation – are paying out. Unique landing pages per medium – desktop, tablet, mobile – and per source – email, social, organic, referral, paid – help us convert leads much better. Having built our mobile search and lead campaigns since the first Google talk we attended in 2010, we now see more paid search conversions to trials coming from our high end search and display ads than from our desktop ads. Traffic to our full site has also increased. And we are constantly learning! Barbara Ulmi, marketing director.