• http://IncreaseVisibility.com Dennis Brennan

    Good stuff Shari.
    We are becoming more and more like physicians & lawyers, we practice, practice and more practice, never to be perfect…

    –Dennis

  • http://www.apexxgroup.com etreske

    I enjoyed the post Sharri, it’s always good to hear from an experienced and successful SEO practitioner. This post reminded me of an SEOmoz video I just read and it’s all about the big picture. SEO gets relegated to so many minute details that often we fail to see the big picture and remember why SEO even exists- to get yourself or company in front of your target audience. I am looking forward to Part 2! Here’s the link to the video as well:
    http://www.seomoz.org/blog/whiteboard-friday-when-optimizing-dont-test-everything

  • http://www.dragonsearchmarketing.com Etela

    I can totally connect with these topics and am looking forward to your next post. There are many challanges for SEOs and I hope you will be writing about some of the challanges of working with developers, who often try to tell me “it can’t be done” when I know for sure that it can, but it means the developers will have to change the way they are used to doing things. It would also be great if you could give some advice on how to deal with the resistance; how to convice teams you are working with to accept the SEO recommendations.

  • http://www.doyoualoha.com mkematt

    Thanks for the great article! Today, it’s imperative that Search Marketers become “experts” beyond PPC and SEO alone. Optimizing a site properly must include other areas like User Experience, Design & Programming/Development. All of these areas need to complement each other in order to drive traffic and conversions.

  • http://www.search-usability.com/ Shari Thurow

    Hey guys-

    Thank you very much for your comments. It is very difficult to come up with the most deadly SEO sins — there are so many of them. But I found that they tended to be grouped in these main categories.

    Etela, I empathize with you about developers. I am a designer/developer. So I see both sides. In general, developers certainly do not accommodate known searcher behaviors. In fact, I would be so bold to say that most developers are not even aware of searcher behaviors. I also believe most developers make sites difficult to navigation, unless they work with a person or group with a background in information architecture and usability or some other non-technical industry.

    There are books on GUI design that highlight these challenges…even though there is not one mention of SEO in them…which I find to be very interesting.

    Anyway, I hope you all enjoy Part 2. And please, by all means, let me know an egregious sin that I might have overlooked.

    :-)

    –Shari