• http://twitter.com/Yakezie Yakezie

    I love CEO Paul’s candor and his rightful focus on tenacity. I’d love to know what improvement in “quality” he has instituted because hubpages quality still can’t match the quality of dedicated bloggers writing on the same topic on their own domains IMO.

    Sam

  • Durant Imboden

    I agree with Mr. Edmondson that “surgical” quality assessments would have made more sense than the “blunt instrument” approach, but I can understand Google’s point of view. Applying an overall quality score (or algorithmic penalty, as in Panda’s case) encourages publishers to give at least some thought to what they’re publishing.

    In the case of a crowdsourced site like HubPages, Googles AuthorRank project might offer some relief (assuming that AuthorRank becomes a factor in Google Search rankings), since it would give a boost to contributors who have earned “author authority” for their topics.

    Regarding the use of subdomains for individual authors, this sounds to me like an attempt to exploit a possible loophole in Panda. Even if the loophole is working, is it likely to go on working indefinitely?

  • K C Allen

    Quality control is hard for a site as large as HubPages, and as “open” as the staff likes to call their no-barrier publishing model. However, that doesn’t mean HP is blameless for the backlog of low-quality content that they allowed to flourish before Panda — and have yet to clean up. I’ve yet to see HP admit their traffic problems are chiefly their own fault; everything is Google’s fault. That goes for all sites that got hit.

    “After we heard from Google that one of our authors (who we thought was pretty good) had quality issues…” Any guesses as to who the canary is? I have a few.

  • Jan
  • Andrew Shotland

    Quote of the day: “our data shows that as the quality of a page increases, its effective revenue decreases.”

  • http://www.ikf.co.in/digitalmarketing/seo-services.html SEO Services – IKF

    Google’s Panda update has ruined many small as well as big businesses. The approach behind this is simple to divert the small and big businesses towards Adwords Campaign. There are still so many crap sites with very low quality or less content in top rankings why Google is unable to see them.

  • http://www.facebook.com/dinheiro Custodio Fernandes

    I don´t see HubPages recovering any time soon. And I don´t know who does there SEO, but I wouldn´t want them touching any of my sites. For example, you wouldn´t be able to link from a hub to Searchengineland simply because Searchengineland has a pop-up on their site. So basically, HubPages removed tons of great content simply because it links to any kind of site that uses pop-ups…. lol This is just one example, there are a few more moves of that “caliber”

  • Jan

    See my post here aswell, it seems Google is providing low quality results on purpose https://groups.google.com/a/googleproductforums.com/d/msg/webmasters/-/OiX6-HdwdjAJ

  • http://www.facebook.com/brendoneill Brendon O’Neill

    Do these two phrases seem to contradict each other, or am I misunderstanding?

    It’s more difficult for individuals to find an audience now. Many new high-quality pages never see exposure in Google.

    This economic change may create an opportunity for genuine, independent enthusiasts (who enjoy a lower cost structure and the ability to vertically integrate all aspects of the content creation process) to succeed.

  • http://twitter.com/YoungbloodJoe Joe Youngblood

    except that this ‘quality score’ seems to have missed blogspot and youtube completely…..

  • http://www.dekh.com/members/profile/13 Harsh Bawa

    I have seen how Hubpages has become a lot more strict with Content and quality. The new posts are not approved easily and the quality is the foremost consideration.
    The subdomain creation part was a very strategic move and I believe it helped them to further refine the low quality content and focus on informative, qualitative content for which Hubpages has been always known.

  • http://basecamptrekking.com/ Shankar Banjara

    Quality control is hard for a site as large as HubPages, and as “open”
    as the staff likes to call their no-barrier publishing model. However,
    that doesn’t mean HP is blameless for the backlog of low-quality content
    that they allowed to flourish before Panda — and have yet to clean
    up.