• Pat Grady

    Nobody likes to checkout on their phone… I wonder when mobile shopping sites funnel will end with a button that says “Email Buy Link”, where the EBL does four things: (1) takes them directly to the cart with items already added; (2) unifies the mobile shopping early funnel activity with the desktop / tablet late funnel sales tracking and analytics; (3) builds optin email lists; (4) caters to consumer preferences to checkout on something besides their phone.

  • evan britton

    Agreed, mobile checkout is a major issue. One interesting thing Google has announced is Chrome Autofill to help users fill out forms on Mobile Devices http://chrome.blogspot.co.uk/2013/11/browse-faster-on-mobile-with-new.html

  • Gazalla Gaya

    Some excellent tips. Studies show that mobile users are more task-oriented. Most want to get in and out quickly. I have a question I hope that you can answer for me. I agree with you about keeping content short for mobiles. At the same time, Google is rewarding long-form content, in-depth articles and is penalizing sites with thin content. What do we do? Do we create content that’s long-form or short-form?

  • Gazalla Gaya

    Some excellent tips. Studies show that mobile users are more task-oriented. Most want to get in and out quickly. I have a question I hope that you can answer for me. I agree with you about keeping content short for mobiles. At the same time, Google is rewarding long-form content, in-depth articles and is penalizing sites with thin content. What do we do? Do we create content that’s long-form or short-form?

  • http://www.freehealthcaretips.net/ Raviraj Tak

    Thanks Barbara Starr its worth reading your post, I already started my views and strategies to optimize mobile websites for my clients. Lesser the steps the more the sales.

  • stuart mcmillan

    I’m not sure I’d agree with the core principle that mobile users are different. I think they are the same people, just with smaller screens. They’re just less tolerant of poor design because of that. In the UK we’ve seen massive mobile growth, in my company we expect smartphone traffic to exceed desktop traffic by the middle of this year. We’ve also seen mobile conversion rate going up year on year.

    I think it’s dangerous to treat mobile users differently, I think if you get your design right your users will use all the same features as your desktop experience. The list of expectations of a mobile site could easily be applied to any user-centric desktop site. I think their top 10 reasons for using your site will be the same as on the desktop site, perhaps in a slightly different order.

    As users become more mobile, mobile will be the new normal and we’ll be obliged to offer fully featured mobile sites. Which are designed to be usable on mobiles, of course.

  • http://www.thesofaandchair.co.uk/ Tom Goodwin

    Hi Gazella, IMHO the best approach is to opt for responsive design – showing the same content for mobile/tablet/desktop with the navigation adjusting depending on device. Matt Cutts is a fan also, which helps!
    http://searchenginewatch.com/article/2308069/Googles-Matt-Cutts-Responsive-Design-Wont-Hurt-Your-SEO

  • http://www.thesofaandchair.co.uk/ Tom Goodwin

    User testing is the way forward. Stop guessing how your mobile searchers differ from desktop and try to establish the facts for your product/service/industry. Ask close friends, family members, customers, suppliers and strangers to rate your mobile web experience. Companies like what users do can also help