• http://www.imagefreedom.com/ Matthew Egan

    I feel like this stops at the Blog step, and there is a lot of opportunity for internal anchor text links back to the really important pages that they want to rank, and stopping at the blog underserves those pages.

    That said, your “idea graph” of things you should be including on your blog is totally awesome, and should be stolen, re-used, emulated, and copied mercilessly. =)

  • http://www.imagefreedom.com/ Matthew Egan

    I feel like this stops at the Blog step, and there is a lot of opportunity for internal anchor text links back to the really important pages that they want to rank, and stopping at the blog underserves those pages.

    That said, your “idea graph” of things you should be including on your blog is totally awesome, and should be stolen, re-used, emulated, and copied mercilessly. =)

  • Alec Green

    Great stuff Ted. You almost have enough content here to publish
    a whitepaper on writing whitepapers!

    For most B2B marketers, the definition of “white paper” is very grey.
    Only rarely do I come across one that is is blatantly self-promotional or an in-depth
    examination of their own solution (an adverwhitepaper?, whitepapertisement?
    whitepapertorial?). But it’s equally rare to see one that is grounded in secondary research. Finding and sourcing the right publications takes work. And it’s
    hard enough just to get the original ideas out of your organization and down on paper.

    I agree that there needs to be some heft to these papers.
    But the average reader may be turned off by anything longer than 3000 words.
    It’s a sad commentary, but a reality of the world we live in. Most
    people would rather have something they can consume quickly or skim than carve
    out a block of time to read and digest your findings.

  • http://tommangan.net/ Tom Mangan

    Excellent tips. Something else you can do to repurpose: take existing content from previous white papers and fold it into new white papers devoted to new topics. I have a client who sends me a bunch of work every month doing this.

    Another tactic: you can interview somebody in the company, have somebody transcribe it and hand of the transcription to a writer: you basically say “look, your research is pretty much done — it’s all in the interview transcript” and you can turn it much faster (and at lower cost) because the writer doesn’t have to burn hours and hours researching the topic. Most professional writers can dash off an article or white paper pretty quickly once the research is done.

  • http://BrianHansford.com/ Brian Hansford

    Fantastic how you show a white papers can be diversified through multiple channels. Too many B2B orgs look at “white papers” as the end-all for a marketing campaign. It’s just the beginning and when used properly, the SEO benefits can be valuable.

    Cheers,
    Brian

  • http://www.readz.com/ Bart De Pelsmaeker

    Hi Ted – this is just awesome. By far the most complete overview incl graph that I have come across. This will be a fantastic help for my next white paper. I would add one element in the list : the whitepaper itself can generate SEO juice, if published not as a PDF but as a web app(lication) using tools like ours at Readz (excuse me I’ll just paste in our URL if you want to check us out http://readz.com )