• http://www.metronet.no Trond Lyngbø

    Nice one, Marshall! :-)

  • http://www.daviddemille.com daveydemille

    Great article. It’s interesting that traditional media companies are switching over to duplicate titles to cater to both humans and robots. I appreciate that you also mention shared responsibility and how creating a company culture that embraces SEO is important to overall success.

  • http://www.seoskeptic.com/ Aaron Bradley

    Great stuff Marshall. What particularly resonated with me are the little things that fail to be acted upon in an enterprise environment, especially in light of the “SEO vs. everyone else” tension. “Little” graphical or textual changes for non-SEO marketing reasons are, in my experience, far more likely to be made than similarly small changes for SEO purposes. This is often, in part, an SEO institutional failure, in that the case for ROI has not been properly made, or the general importance of search visibility and the means to improve it has not been sufficiently communicated to executive stakeholders. But just as often it is decision makers prioritizing what they know and trust, regardless of their level of comfort with SEO.

    Taken further, this can and have disastrous consequences for SEO efforts. Alas, I’ve been in many situations where not only “little” SEO tasks are sidelined, but big, important ones as well. With much at stake and finite resources, there’s inevitably a long list of bugs, improvements and innovations that executives are forced to prioritize when it comes to web design and development. Without a forceful and effective marketer on board advocating for these – and, as you say, continually educating stakeholders on the value and machinations of SEO – important search marketing tasks are likely to find themselves deferred for days, months and even years.

    I always find it amusing (tragically) that so many organizations have little difficulty in sustaining PPC spends with a demonstrably negative ROI, year after year, yet invest so little in SEO. And I think that’s because so many CMOs are suspicious of what they can’t directly count – again suggesting that a key role of an SEO in an enterprise environment is to make organic search ROI easy to understand. Most SEOs I know hate forecasting because by its nature its an exercise in fudging the numbers (I don’t know of anyone that can come remotely close to providing an accurate figure on the impact of moving a ranking for keyword X from #15 to #5). But I think it’s sometimes a necessary evil when it comes to getting the resources an enterprise SEO needs to get the job done.

  • http://rockfi.sh steveplunkett

    Nothing but #wisdom. Thanks for confirming many things.
    Integration of SEO at every level of digital innovation is crucial to staying ahead of the competition.
    from broad to specific, branded and unbranded.. organic has the highest conversion and lower cost.. IF.. integrated throughout the processes. IT can work very well and be very profitable for the enterprise across multi-national boundaries and locations. Which involves different versions of Google.. know them all, inform the client what’s different. document, audit, tie to cash register.. repeat.. weekly, monthly, quaterly. ranking reports and traffic gap analysis..

    3mins.. (it’s 7:57) then i’m on someone’s clock.. damn.. where is that quote..

    “There are instances when decisions are made against best practices and may take precedence over SEO. This is natural and not necessarily a bad thing. However these decisions must be made fully understanding the consequences.”

    two words.. DUE DILLIGENCE

    thanks again for the confirmation of many previous decisions in building enterprise level SEO teams.

    @steveplunkett
    sr. search scientist
    @rockfish

  • http://rockfi.sh steveplunkett

    all good comments are ruined by typos.. paisley’s internet law.

    DUE DILIGENCE

  • http://webmd.com roseberry

    I think anyone doing managing SEO at a large website will (or at least should) get a lot out of this. The only thing I’d add to Aaron’s comments (which are always spot on) is that working in enterprise SEO and pitching new tactics often means you HAVE TO have some prediction for performance. When implementing new tactics, upper management – no matter sold they are on optimization efforts – tend to want projections. They want to know how what you’re proposing is going to ultimately perform and what kind of traffic they can expect. This can be scary for a lot of SEO folks who are used to saying there is never any guarantee for ranking. While true, you can often build some projections off similar small tests and adjust to scale, or look at other sites that employ similar tactics and use hitwise, compete, etc. to try and gauge their success and adjust yours based on how similar or dissimilar. Or, look for case studies that others have published (like the rel=author one you mention in the post)

    It is scary, and often not that easy to measure and validate after the fact, but if you embrace it and trust the data you can really get a lot accomplished. And if you get used to it, it can even become a great way to prioritize your own time and efforts.

  • http://www.visiture.com Vi

    I completely agree that SEO education is pertinent, especially when in a big company and many don’t understand that everything that takes place online affects ranking (or perhaps it doesn’t, but it’s best to operate under the notion it *does*). I also agree with roseberry that you must often present projections, but I think expectation management is second nature to any good SEO. Great article, great read as always Aaron.

  • http://www.visiture.com Vi

    I completely agree that SEO education is pertinent, especially when in a big company and many don’t understand that everything that takes place online affects ranking (or perhaps it doesn’t, but it’s best to operate under the notion it *does*). I also agree with roseberry that you must often present projections, but I think expectation management is second nature to any good SEO. Great article, great read as always Marshall.

  • http://www.loudlaunch.com Toni Atkinson

    We are not Enterprise SEO but your post has given me “a new opportunity”. SEO has been exploding in many different directions and reading your ‘Execution=SEO Win’ reminds us to keep perspective and stay productive. No matter enterprise or very small, in your words, great content executed fast and correctly wins and we will eventually get to the others like Personal Search (or try too) Thanks for the re-focus tips!