Estimate: Google Mobile Search Market Share Near 100%

Greg Sterling on
  • Categories: Channel: Mobile, Google: Mobile, Google: Web Search
  • Let’s be cautious about running too far with these numbers, but Royal Pingdom (using data from StatCounter) has reported/estimated Google’s global mobile search market share to be almost 100%

    Google is clearly dominant in mobile search across smartphones (and feature phones). However these numbers may not be completely accurate. For example, the chart above shows PC and mobile search market share according to StatCounter. But while the general PC search share numbers may reflect selected markets (e.g., UK) they’re not accurate for the US and a number of other places around the world.

    I’ve conducted mobile user surveys and seen plenty of third party data over the past two years that suggests the case isn’t quite this lopsided. At least a year ago mobile search market share was tracking the desktop generally though was somewhat more skewed in Google’s favor.

    It’s quite possible that Google’s lead has accelerated — especially as Android devices have sold better and better — but I’m somewhat skeptical it’s this extreme. And Google itself doesn’t want this sort of a lopsided market because it will lend fuel to the anti-Google “monopoly” arguments gaining some momentum in pockets around the globe.

    Separately the WSJ reported that Google CEO Eric Schmidt said Android could become a $10 billion market for Google annually:

    “If we have a billion people using Android, you think we can’t make money from that?” Schmidt asked rhetorically. All it would take, he said, is $10 per user per year. Among other things, Google might earn such sums from selling access to digital content from newspapers.


    About The Author

    Greg Sterling
    Greg Sterling is a Contributing Editor at Search Engine Land. He writes a personal blog, Screenwerk, about connecting the dots between digital media and real-world consumer behavior. He is also VP of Strategy and Insights for the Local Search Association. Follow him on Twitter or find him at Google+.