• BarbaraStarr

    We also added somewhat of a guide last week :) and it can be found here: http://selnd.com/1889JKi

  • ScottyMack

    Unfortunately, the “products” schema markup is not really going to come in handy for legitimate eCommerce businesses. eCommerce websites use shopping carts that use a template that ALL products use. Any eCommerce website that is able to take advantage of this tool is a pretty rare one, built with pure HTML, one page at a time. And, close to 100% of the time, they would be hosting their software on a server they don’t control (Host Gator, for instance), making it a PCI compliance nightmare (impossibility, really). I’d definitely question the security of any web store like that.

    It may help some programmers with creating a variable-based product template, though.

    I’m sure it’s great for all the other websites built with a blogging platform, though!

  • http://www.TheeDesign.com/ Raleigh Web Design

    This is exciting! I’m so glad they have made it easier to implement, especially considering how important markup is on SEO: http://www.theedesign.com/blog/2013/5-most-important-semantic-markups-for-your-website

  • http://www.saturngames.co.uk/ Dan Crocker

    I use a commercial eCommerce solution and have been enjoying schema success for over a year now. Really, it isn’t that hard if the software you’re using is open-source (or at least partially open-source).

  • ScottyMack

    Does your payment processing company require monthly PCI Compliance scans? I have yet to see an open source (or not) non-hosted eCommerce solution that could pass a compliance scan on a monthly basis. What software are you using that does this and passes those compliance scans?

  • http://www.saturngames.co.uk/ Dan Crocker

    You get around that by using third-party processing, 2Checkout, Google Wallet, PayPal, etc. The store and processing and entirely separate, and the data is passed to them directly over HTTPS, then the customer is directed back once payment has been taken.

  • ScottyMack

    Well, that’s the problem. You are losing a TON of sales if you only use third party checkout solutions. The very first thing we look at when we think about buying a website from someone is whether or not they only take third party payments like PayPal or Google Wallet. If so, we know it is a seriously undervalued website and that we can double or even triple sales by offering a real on-site payment solution. We can buy a website that is only taking PayPal, add a real payment processor to it and flip it in 3-6 months for double the price we paid for it – just because business grows that much, that fast with a real payment processor.

  • http://www.saturngames.co.uk/ Dan Crocker

    Interesting. I do actually pay very close attention to the checkout process, tracking when / if people fail to complete the transaction. You would be right in assuming that the final step (payment) is the biggest reason, but it really only represents a small single-digit percentage of drop-outs. You might be surprised to learn almost nobody chooses the PayPal option since we made Wallet available.

  • ScottyMack

    Well, every niche is different. In your niche, you are selling very low priced items to what I would imagine is a considerably younger market than many other websites. We generally don’t even look at a website unless the average ticket produces AT LEAST a $30 profit (preferably $50-$100 minimum). We have had Google wallet on several sites for two years or more and never had a single person use it. When you are selling things that cost several hundred to several thousand dollars, you really begin to appreciate the protection afforded to the seller that a real bank gives. Far too many nightmare stories out there about sellers losing a ton because PayPal backs the consumer and not the business in all disputed charges. We’ve seen case after case of businesses losing a chargeback with PayPal even when they had a verified adult signature proving a delivery had been made. I hope Google Wallet protects merchants better than that. You never really know until it happens to you, though, and it probably is not something that comes up all that often with lower priced items.

    Anyway, I am WAY off-topic now. The real solution to the schema markup is to hire a programmer to change the common product template and insert the schema code utilizing variables that pick up things like price, product ratings, name, SKU, etc. from each product automatically. It would sure suck having to do it individually for each product when you have hundreds or even thousands of products.

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