• http://www.mobilemartin.com/ Michael Martin PMP

    I agree that the SEs won’t ding mobile versions as dup content especially as those versions would have minimalized code vs the desktop version & should have some mobile backend code identification.

    To be safe, I covered the basics of mobile coding implementation at Search Engine Journal last week – http://www.searchenginejournal.com/mobile-seo-future-planning/20258/

  • ho_logos

    It’s not clear that we should breathe any easier even if we know that the engines are not counting mobile content as dup.

    For some long tail terms, I see both m.domain.com and http://www.domain.com appear on page one when doing a desktop search. This suggests two potential scenarios. First, that my m pages are competing with my www pages for serp placement for desktop queries. Second, that my www pages area competing with competitors’ m pages for serp placement for desktop queries.

    So, the dilemma is as follows:
    Either search engines treat m content as duplicate or not duplicate.
    If duplicate, then we run the risk of our m page content diluting the SEO weight of our www page content in the serps for standard searches.
    If not duplicate, then we run the risk of our m pages competing with our www pages in the serps for standard searches AND our www pages have to battle with competitor m pages in the serps for standard searches.

  • http://searchengineland.com Cindy Krum

    Hey Bryson,

    Nice article!

    In some cases, I think it is a valid strategy, but I generally recommend a mobile robots solution only as recourse to indexing problems or when mobile content begins to out-rank traditional content in traditional search. I always tell people that it is a last resort, and to approach it with extreme caution. I don’t think that mobile content ‘should’ be considered duplicate content, but I acknowledge that it could still be counted that way if something goes wrong.

    Thanks,
    CK