• http://www.brysonmeunier.com/ Bryson Meunier

    Kamil, thanks for your comments and you are entitled to your opinion. My response is below.

    “I completely can not agree with you. Point 1.2.3 are not SEO, positioning or SERP’s differeneces. There is only form changed, not results.”
    Tell that to Zagat, who is much less likely to get traffic from the keyword in the Android browser since they’ve gone from the first listing to the 8th, or to the Weather Channel, who probably won’t get a visit organically from the query ‘weather’ from Android users running Jelly Bean, as the web results don’t even appear until the female voice is finished telling you the current weather conditions. Web rankings have only mattered historically because first position on the desktop typically brings more organic traffic. It’s not about rankings, it’s ultimately about traffic and conversions, and these “form” changes, as you say, are very likely to affect organic traffic and conversions, and thus SEO.
    “Point 4. If u r logged in on your desktop you also have personalized SERPs. Nothing changed here, no difference between mobile and desktop.”
    But Android users are always logged in. If you don’t think there’s a difference between being occasionally logged in and always logged in, you’re really not looking at this critically enough to notice the differences I’m discussing.
    “Ad point 5. There are a lot of queries on dekstop where the images will be first results.”
    Yes, but the point of this article was to show the differences between mobile and desktop, however subtle. This is a difference that could affect organic traffic, so I’m advising marketers who care about organic traffic and conversions to be aware of it. If you don’t care about it, that’s your prerogative. But it’s arguably not SEO, which is about optimization, or the optimal case. “Ad. point 6. Filtering doesn;t mean changing the results in searches. It just filters – the same on mobile devices and desktops.”
    Again, click through rate affects conversions, and differences like this can filter traffic to different parts of the page, and not to a shopping cart or a publisher ad. These subtle differences can matter when it comes to revenue from organic search, so they’re worth pointing out.
    “Ad Point 8. I checked on my phone and desktop and cant see any difference.”
    Oh, well, then it’s settled. ;)
    Here’s Google’s announcement from two years ago of the change if you need further proof: http://googlemobile.blogspot.com/2010/06/google-search-for-mobile-now-includes.html
    If you put in app-seeking queries (i.e. queries containing “download” or “app”) on a smartphone you are very likely to get app results in mobile and not on desktop. Check again.
    “10.11.12 are only changed forms.”
    And changed “forms” affects click through rate, traffic and conversions. As an SEO, do you not care about these things?
    “Ad Point 14. This is interesting, but can be technically hard to devides websites into mobile friendly and not firendly. We can have m.domain.com website with redirecting or have o scalable website written in html5. Which is better? Both solutions are correct and mobile firendly. And the world trend in making websites is to use html5 and creaty friendly sites for people general (those using dekstops, mobile devices and even disabled).”
    Google will give an icon regardless of whether the site is on a mobile URL or was built with responsive design in mind, provided you follow their guidelines for creating smartphone content that I mentioned in the piece: https://developers.google.com/webmasters/smartphone-sites/
    “Mobile SEO is strange fashion for me. At my company everyone have orgasm while talking about mobile marketing and seo, but no one ever consider how can it works. Let’s say mobile shopping. Looking at Googe Analytics I can see that form 40 mobile buys at interent shop 39 are made from tablet and only one on smartphone. What does it mean? It means taht shopping through mobile phones is not comfortable and can;t be popular (escpecially in normal shopping which is common nowadays). I can imagine some markting campaigns, discounts etc. Or maybe shopping connected with mobile, but I can;t image someone buying underwear while using iphone…”
    Has it ever occurred to you that you’re not optimized for mobile search traffic? Or that your site makes it difficult to convert from a smartphone? Or that a searcher is researching on a smartphone and buying offline or on a tablet or computer later, as so many do? Try telling eBay that shopping on mobile phones is not popular and very uncomfortable. They made their mobile offerings easy to use and did $8 billion in mobile commerce retail volume as a result. Or to Amazon, who did $2 billion last year in mobile commerce. Yes, people like to shop on tablets, but if you give them a reason to buy on their smartphones and make it easy to do so, they will.

    People will even buy things that you wouldn’t think they would. For example, eBay routinely sells sports cars through their mobile app, as Oracle reported last year on their blog (https://blogs.oracle.com/retail/entry/ebay_leads_mobile_commerce):

    “eBay claims they sell 3-4 Ferraris on their mobile app each month. Yes, mobile commerce is not limited to small items. While I would wait to get home and fire up the PC, the current generation that has grown up with mobile phones has no issue satisfying their impulses. Dave Sikora of Digby told me he’s seen people buy furniture sets, mattresses, and diamonds via their mobile phones.
    I guess mobile commerce is rapidly becoming the norm.”
    This is a mobile commerce issue more than a straight SEO issue, but the point is: don’t make generalizations about the industry based on what’s happening on your site.
    I appreciate your comments but obviously can’t agree. All of these things can affect organic traffic and conversions from Google, regardless of whether they affect web rankings, and thus affect SEO.
    Best,
    Bryson

  • http://www.brysonmeunier.com/ Bryson Meunier

    Kamil, thanks for your comments and you are entitled to your
    opinion. My response is below.

    “I completely can not agree with you. Point
    1.2.3 are not SEO, positioning or SERP’s differeneces. There is only form
    changed, not results.”

    Tell that to Zagat, who is much less likely to get traffic
    from the keyword in the Android browser since they’ve gone from the first
    listing to the 8th, or to the Weather Channel, who probably won’t get a visit
    organically from the query [weather] from Android users running Jelly Bean, as
    the web results don’t even appear until the female voice is finished telling
    you the current weather conditions. Web rankings have only mattered
    historically because first position on the desktop typically brings more
    organic traffic. It’s not about rankings, it’s ultimately about traffic and
    conversions, and these “form” changes, as you say, are very likely to affect
    organic traffic and conversions, and thus SEO.

    “Point 4. If u r
    logged in on your desktop you also have personalized SERPs. Nothing changed
    here, no difference between mobile and desktop.”

    But Android users are always logged in. If you don’t think
    there’s a difference between being occasionally logged in and always logged in,
    you’re really not looking at this critically enough to notice the differences I’m
    discussing.

    “Ad point 5. There are
    a lot of queries on dekstop where the images will be first results.”

    Yes, but the point of this article was to show the
    differences between mobile and desktop, however subtle. This is a difference
    that could affect organic traffic, so I’m advising marketers who care about
    organic traffic and conversions to be aware of it. If you don’t care about it,
    that’s your prerogative. But it’s arguably not SEO, which is about
    optimization, or the optimal case.

    “Ad. point 6.
    Filtering doesn;t mean changing the results in searches. It just filters – the
    same on mobile devices and desktops.”

    Again, click through rate affects traffic and conversions,
    and differences like this can filter traffic to different parts of the page,
    and not to a shopping cart or a publisher ad. These subtle differences can
    matter when it comes to revenue from organic search, so they’re worth pointing
    out.

    “Ad Point 8. I checked
    on my phone and desktop and cant see any difference.”

    Oh, well, then it’s settled. ;)

    Here’s Google’s announcement from two years ago of the
    change if you need further proof: http://googlemobile.blogspot.com/2010/06/google-search-for-mobile-now-includes.html

    If you put in app-seeking queries (i.e. queries containing “download”
    or “app”) on a smartphone you are very likely to get app results in mobile and
    not on desktop. Check again.

    “10.11.12 are only
    changed forms.”

    And changed “forms” affects click through rate, traffic and
    conversions. As an SEO, do you not care about these things?

    “Ad Point 14. This is
    interesting, but can be technically hard to devides websites into mobile
    friendly and not firendly. We can have m.domain.com website with redirecting or
    have o scalable website written in html5. Which is better? Both solutions are
    correct and mobile firendly. And the world trend in making websites is to use
    html5 and creaty friendly sites for people general (those using dekstops, mobile
    devices and even disabled).”

    Google will give an icon regardless of whether the site is
    on a mobile URL or was built with responsive design in mind, provided you
    follow their guidelines for creating smartphone content that I mentioned in the
    piece:

    https://developers.google.com/webmasters/smartphone-sites/

    “Mobile SEO is strange
    fashion for me. At my company everyone have orgasm while talking about mobile
    marketing and seo, but no one ever consider how can it works. Let’s say mobile
    shopping. Looking at Googe Analytics I can see that form 40 mobile buys at
    interent shop 39 are made from tablet and only one on smartphone. What does it
    mean? It means taht shopping through mobile phones is not comfortable and can;t
    be popular (escpecially in normal shopping which is common nowadays). I can
    imagine some markting campaigns, discounts etc. Or maybe shopping connected
    with mobile, but I can;t image someone buying underwear while using iphone…”

    Has it ever occurred to you that maybe you’re not optimized for
    mobile search traffic? Or that your site makes it difficult to convert from a
    smartphone? Or that a searcher is researching on a smartphone and buying
    offline or on a tablet or computer later, as so many do? Try telling eBay that
    shopping on mobile phones is not popular and very uncomfortable. They made
    their mobile offerings easy to use and did $8 billion in mobile commerce retail
    volume as a result. Or to Amazon, who did $2 billion last year in mobile
    commerce. Yes, people like to shop on tablets, but if you give them a reason to
    buy on their smartphones and make it easy to do so, they will.

    People will even buy things that you wouldn’t think they
    would. For example, eBay routinely sells sports cars through their mobile app,
    as Oracle reported last year on their blog (https://blogs.oracle.com/retail/entry/ebay_leads_mobile_commerce):

    “eBay claims they sell 3-4 Ferraris on their mobile app each
    month. Yes, mobile commerce is not limited to small items. While I would wait
    to get home and fire up the PC, the current generation that has grown up with
    mobile phones has no issue satisfying their impulses. Dave Sikora of Digby told
    me he’s seen people buy furniture sets, mattresses, and diamonds via their
    mobile phones.

    I guess mobile commerce is rapidly becoming the norm.”

    This is a mobile commerce issue more than a straight SEO
    issue, but the point is: don’t make generalizations about the industry based on
    what’s happening on your site.

    I appreciate your comments but obviously can’t agree. All of
    these things can affect organic traffic and conversions from Google, regardless
    of whether they affect web rankings, and thus affect SEO.

    Best,

    Bryson

  • SOMFW

    Great Article.
    I thought I was Going nuts. With my searches, no matter how I word them, (depending on subject matter), nearly every time the results are just App Store Links, which is Really annoying me. Ask Android search “Why are Android search results all APP Links”
    Answer? A half a page of worthless APP Store links! This is making me use other search engines, since upgrading to jelly Bean. I wish there was a way to fix this, but if it continues, Windows phone / Bing here I come.