• http://websitecash.net/ Scott McKirahan

    This is insane. If I am reading this correctly, you are suggesting that eCommerce websites tag words on their pages? Talk about an absolutely horrible user experience! It never ceases to amaze me how much website owners are being forced to change things because of the completely inadequate search engine algorithms. It should be the other way around, you know!

  • https://plus.google.com/112399767740508618350/about kidehen

    @ScottyMack:disqus — note how disqus automagically auto completed “@ScottyMack” when you made your comments. Likewise, notice how using #SEO on G+, Twitter, or Facebook will get you to all topics associated with the hashtag? These are all examples of the effects of tagging content published on the Web.

    The pattern: “@ScottyMack” is a shorthand for an HTTP URI from disqus that denotes “You” .

    The pattern: #SEO is a shorthand for an HTTP URI that denotes the topic “SEO”.

    This post is simply about the fact that “ScottyMack” (literal denotation of “You”) is no longer optimal when referring to “You” on the Web . The same applies to topics, as in “SEO” being suboptimal relative to #SEO .

    Google refers to this as: Things instead of Strings, but that catchy moniker is misleading becuase the real issue at hand is the evolution of denotation (naming) away from Strings Identifiers to Reference Identifiers — such as HTTP URIs.

    “@” and “#” are just shorthands for HTTP URIs that denote agents and topics respectively :-)

  • https://plus.google.com/112399767740508618350/about kidehen

    @ScottyMack:disqus — note how disqus automagically auto completed “@ScottyMack” when you made your comments. Likewise, notice how using #SEO on G+, Twitter, or Facebook will get you to all topics associated with the hashtag? These are all examples of the effects of tagging content published on the Web.

    The pattern: “@ScottyMack” is a shorthand for an HTTP URI from disqus that denotes “You” .

    The pattern: #SEO is a shorthand for an HTTP URI that denotes the topic “SEO”.

    This post is simply about the fact that “ScottyMack” (literal denotation of “You”) is no longer optimal when referring to “You” on the Web . The same applies to topics, as in “SEO” being suboptimal relative to #SEO .

    Google refers to this as: Things instead of Strings, but that catchy moniker is misleading becuase the real issue at hand is the evolution of denotation (naming) away from Strings Identifiers to Reference Identifiers — such as HTTP URIs.

    “@” and “#” are just shorthands for HTTP URIs that denote agents and topics respectively :-)

  • https://plus.google.com/112399767740508618350/about kidehen

    @ScottyMack:disqus — note how disqus automagically auto completed “@ScottyMack” when you made your comments. Likewise, notice how using #SEO on G+, Twitter, or Facebook will get you to all topics associated with the hashtag? These are all examples of the effects of tagging content published on the Web.

    The pattern: “@ScottyMack” is a shorthand for an HTTP URI from disqus that denotes “You” .

    The pattern: #SEO is a shorthand for an HTTP URI that denotes the topic “SEO”.

    This post is simply about the fact that “ScottyMack” (literal denotation of “You”) is no longer optimal when referring to “You” on the Web . The same applies to topics, as in “SEO” being suboptimal relative to #SEO .

    Google refers to this as: Things instead of Strings, but that catchy moniker is misleading becuase the real issue at hand is the evolution of denotation (naming) away from Strings Identifiers to Reference Identifiers — such as HTTP URIs.

    “@” and “#” are just shorthands for HTTP URIs that denote agents and topics respectively :-)

  • http://www.alittlebranding.com/ Bob Strassel Jr.

    Paul, great post! So much great information.I have 2 questions: Do you think that companies who implement LOD’s will have a first mover advantage over competitors?And how do you think that this “scales” for small businesses who may not have the resources to implement? Thanks again!

  • http://www.alittlebranding.com/ Bob Strassel Jr.

    Paul, great post! So much great information.I have 2 questions: Do you think that companies who implement LOD’s will have a first mover advantage over competitors?And how do you think that this “scales” for small businesses who may not have the resources to implement? Thanks again!

  • Addam Hassan

    This is one of the best or should I say most exciting articles I’ve read. Could you recommend any resources that you’ve seen that would help e-commerce sites outside the traditional Google and Schema.org that would provide a good walk through. I recently came across this http://www.iacquire.com/blog/18-meta-tags-every-webpage-should-have-in-2013/ does anyone else have any further recommendations?

  • Addam Hassan

    This is one of the best or should I say most exciting articles I’ve read. Could you recommend any resources that you’ve seen that would help e-commerce sites outside the traditional Google and Schema.org that would provide a good walk through. I recently came across this http://www.iacquire.com/blog/18-meta-tags-every-webpage-should-have-in-2013/ does anyone else have any further recommendations?

  • http://www.paulbruemmer.com/ Paul Bruemmer

    Bob, it is logical those participating in
    LOD cloud will be better poised and prepared for the growth when it
    happens. Existing and new technologies will determine new ways of
    exploiting LOD cloud to the benefit of everyone visiting the Web. Intuition tells me this will scale to connect and empower all
    SMBs as a group e.g., united we stand, divided we fall. Semantic strategists and technologists will figure out ways to leverage LOD and SMBs via existing and new devices. Have fun with it!

  • emekaokoye

    Excellent post, Paul. I suggest you update your 4th paragraph:
    ” That’s why it’s important for SEOs to understand and use LOD when applying structured data to content — to make it easier for machines to read that content. ”
    to something like
    ” That’s why it’s important for SEOs to understand and use LOD when applying structured data to content — to make it easier for machines to read that content as well as for humans to discover and understand it too. ”
    Remember the SEOs main objective is to improve discoverability by both machines and humans. Machine-only comprehension of content does not sound right as a major factor for SEOs in adopting the Semantic Web.
    Thoughts?

  • http://www.alittlebranding.com/ Bob Strassel Jr.

    Thanks Paul, let’s hope that happens. Is there anyone out there working with SMB’s specifically to enable this now? Or do you think there is time and we are in the early adoption phase?

  • http://www.metapilot.com/ Metapilot

    I’m excited by the granularity in product descriptions and the richness of meanings LOD enables. Search engines today are so clumsy when it comes to distinguishing between similar objects (for example, intricate widgets that are identical except for a single characteristic). When a site contains a lot of those, it’s likely to get lumped into the spam bucket as “duplicate” or “thin” content. Of course, that has as much to do with the language we (marketers) use as it does with the search engines ability to draw distinctions from it.

    I might assert that your list of three linked open data advantages could be construed as a bit #naive, however. As far as “openness” goes, future “search engines” will still have to employ an algorithm to prioritize a list of search results and that algorithm will always have biases of some sort–leaving open opportunities for exploitation. And even though rudimentary, the primary descriptive tools of today’s SEO–words–are certainly themselves search engine agnostic. I don’t foresee structured content eliminating all opportunities for the marketer to figure out how to use it in ways that will give them an advantage over a competitor in algorithmic search results. I think we’ll also see that greater granularity will beget greater competition, making discoverability in the LOD world not that much different than it is in today’s world.

    Thanks for your article. It makes me believe that there is still a lot to look forward to in the world of search.

  • http://www.metapilot.com/ Metapilot

    I’m excited by the granularity in product descriptions and the richness of meanings LOD enables. Search engines today are so clumsy when it comes to distinguishing between similar objects (for example, intricate widgets that are identical except for a single characteristic). When a site contains a lot of those, it’s likely to get lumped into the spam bucket as “duplicate” or “thin” content. Of course, that has as much to do with the language we (marketers) use as it does with the search engines ability to draw distinctions from it.

    I might assert that your list of three linked open data advantages could be construed as a bit #naive, however. As far as “openness” goes, future “search engines” will still have to employ an algorithm to prioritize a list of search results and that algorithm will always have biases of some sort–leaving open opportunities for exploitation. And even though rudimentary, the primary descriptive tools of today’s SEO–words–are certainly themselves search engine agnostic. I don’t foresee structured content eliminating all opportunities for the marketer to figure out how to use it in ways that will give them an advantage over a competitor in algorithmic search results. I think we’ll also see that greater granularity will beget greater competition, making discoverability in the LOD world not that much different than it is in today’s world.

    Thanks for your article. It makes me believe that there is still a lot to look forward to in the world of search.

  • http://www.metapilot.com/ Metapilot

    I’m excited by the granularity in product descriptions and the richness of meanings LOD enables. Search engines today are so clumsy when it comes to distinguishing between similar objects (for example, intricate widgets that are identical except for a single characteristic). When a site contains a lot of those, it’s likely to get lumped into the spam bucket as “duplicate” or “thin” content. Of course, that has as much to do with the language we (marketers) use as it does with the search engines ability to draw distinctions from it.

    I might assert that your list of three linked open data advantages could be construed as a bit #naive, however. As far as “openness” goes, future “search engines” will still have to employ an algorithm to prioritize a list of search results and that algorithm will always have biases of some sort–leaving open opportunities for exploitation. And even though rudimentary, the primary descriptive tools of today’s SEO–words–are certainly themselves search engine agnostic. I don’t foresee structured content eliminating all opportunities for the marketer to figure out how to use it in ways that will give them an advantage over a competitor in algorithmic search results. I think we’ll also see that greater granularity will beget greater competition, making discoverability in the LOD world not that much different than it is in today’s world.

    Thanks for your article. It makes me believe that there is still a lot to look forward to in the world of search.

  • Vipin Kumar

    I have to say this, great information there @pbruemmer:disqus.

    Its amazing how semantic web can help build a (almost) perfect world. Also, I love the fact that LOD will enhance the quality of web search by giving the searchers serendipitous results which may be significant for them but they didn’t know about it, eventually, what we have got is, a searcher with complete information, which is a GREAT thing, considering the fact that “half information is dangerous” :-)

    I am sure, semantic web will make people quite fully informed, which is great for every one on this planet. I guess i am not going overboard, but just trying to think of the implications of semantic web. it looks great from here!!

  • Vipin Kumar

    I have to say this, great information there @pbruemmer:disqus.

    Its amazing how semantic web can help build a (almost) perfect world. Also, I love the fact that LOD will enhance the quality of web search by giving the searchers serendipitous results which may be significant for them but they didn’t know about it, eventually, what we have got is, a searcher with complete information, which is a GREAT thing, considering the fact that “half information is dangerous” :-)

    I am sure, semantic web will make people quite fully informed, which is great for every one on this planet. I guess i am not going overboard, but just trying to think of the implications of semantic web. it looks great from here!!

  • Jesse Greer

    Fantastic article, this should be THE primer for everyone interested in linked data. Bravo.