• http://twitter.com/AbeBellini Abe Bellini

    Nice article, Jenny. I really like the examples you used for informational search queries. Great strategy.

  • http://www.archology.com/ Jenny Halasz

    Thanks, glad you enjoyed it!

  • http://www.buzzmaven.com/ Scott Clark

    Awesome! I would only add one small tactic… the inverted pyramid approach to content bundles. Assume that 80% will read 20%, so the punch line is first and supporting information after.

  • http://www.archology.com/ Jenny Halasz

    Good point, Scott! Thank you.

  • Dean Iodice

    Great post I love the idea of posting the content off the blog creating articles as a informational area as opposed to stuffing all on the blog. This give me some great ideas I’m going to implement right away

  • http://www.bestravelcoupons.com/ Best Travel Coupons

    I would like to add another important value which is very important for writing. Don’t use big words in content. Content should be easy to read and easy to convey your message.

  • http://www.archology.com/ Jenny Halasz

    Glad it was helpful!

  • http://www.delsurseo.com/ Dou9las

    Great article Jenny, this nicely reinforces a strategy that I’ve recently presented to an enterprise client. Not to split hairs nor to be argumentative, but I did want to clarify your point above regarding 50% to 80% of queries being informational. In the linked PDF above, the breakdown provided for queries in the “informational” classification is 48%. This percentage is of course significant and in fact, commands a greater share than the other 2 classifications (Navigational at 20%, Transactional at 30%.) I might be missing some other data and/or conclusions derived from that research, can you clarify for me? I do plan to share your article with my client, so just want to have my ducks in a row. Thank You!

  • Jerry Hilburn

    Hmmm…..

    Interesting, but you have based your analysis and recommendations on a study that informs the state of search as it was in 2001. Hardly relevant to today’s search patterns. I reject the claim that 50-80% of search queries today are informational in nature, as defined in this study.

    I suggest that this study is seriously out of date due to the manner in which it fails to consider Temporal Informational Queries. The Survey Questions do not ask the user if they are searching for temporal types of information which are short lived, and necessarily dynamic! I wonder aloud how this information is relevant today?

    I would prefer to see a study that explores behavioral statistics of 2013 as it relates to search patterns for breaking news, real time events, weather, stock ticker, sports updates, and other dynamic information sets as compared to static “evergreen” content.

    2 centavos deposited.

  • http://www.archology.com/ Jenny Halasz

    Fair enough! I looked everywhere for newer data, but the best I could find was that several other noted industry leaders supported this research in newer posts – Aaron Wall of SEOBook was one. Google has said that as much as 20% of searches have local intent, but the majority of that is estimated by others to be from mobile. Remember the classic definition of informational, navigational, and transactional queries: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_search_query. There’s no distinction for types of informational queries, although you are quite right that temporal informational queries are a significant portion of these in today’s marketplace. I agree that I would like to see a more updated study, but firmly believe that consumption of informational content is still a significant part of user behavior and therefore necessary on most sites. Gracias por tu dos centavos.

  • http://www.archology.com/ Jenny Halasz

    Thank you! You’re correct that the study itself says 48% on the low end, but I saw it referenced many other places as 50-80 and chose to go with that for the sake of simplicity. However, the study is very old (2001) and I was simply using it as a springboard for my hypothesis. I’d try to focus a client on that rather than on the study itself. While I believe those percentages are still pretty accurate today, there hasn’t been a newer study conducted. What I would suggest for you with your client is to familiarize them with the query types: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_search_query and maybe try to find some research on human psychology as it relates to the buying cycle. The concept of the zero moment of truth may also be helpful, as the majority of content shared at that stage is informational as well. Good luck!

  • http://www.delsurseo.com/ Dou9las

    Sounds like an exceptional opportunity to author just such a study since there is an obvious need and demand for it among marketers and SEOs. I think I will get crackin’ on that now and then…hmm, maybe post it in an informational hub on my site to help establish greater authority AND get a boost in ranking and traffic. ;)

  • http://twitter.com/mtipolyexe MTI Polyexe

    I agree in fact I put in the program that allowed for updating of PDFs recently on an e-commerce site. My team did it I will report back more about it but essentially what it does is it allowed the manufacturer to make updates to PDFs inside their website from a third-party piece of software. I’m a big word press guy and believe that this site was not made in WordPress I have to check with my team so I will get that info to. Because a PDF is readable of course it is prime for indexing. In addition it’s great for getting leads because you can ask somebody to give their e-mail address.

  • http://www.blueprintmarketing.com/ Thomas Zickell

    I agree in fact I put in the program that allowed for updating of PDFs recently on an e-commerce site. My team did it I will report back more about it but essentially what it does is it allowed the manufacturer to make updates to PDFs inside their website from a third-party piece of software. I’m a big word press guy and believe that this site was not made in WordPress I have to check with my team so I will get that info to. Because a PDF is readable of course it is prime for indexing. In addition it’s great for getting leads because you can ask somebody to give their e-mail address.

  • http://www.archology.com/ Jenny Halasz

    I love the new capability to render PDFs within a page. Really nice because then when they get indexed, it forces the main site “wrap” around it instead of google just pointing to a .pdf file.

  • http://www.archology.com/ Jenny Halasz

    well-played, sir. ;-)