• http://www.brickmarketing.com/ Nick Stamoulis

    “Evergreen content” can be incredibly useful because you can re-purpose it time and time again. As long as the information is still relevant, why not share it 6 months from now in the company e-newsletter? Obviously you need to stay current but some things never change.

  • http://twitter.com/jennyhalasz Jenny Halasz

    Nick, couldn’t agree more! In fact I often recommend to people that they leave dates off of their posts that aren’t time sensitive. Lots of industries have content that never changes.

  • http://twitter.com/jennyhalasz Jenny Halasz

    Thank you for reading, glad you enjoyed it!

  • http://twitter.com/jennyhalasz Jenny Halasz

    I go through this every day with my clients, most of whom are small business owners. I always ask them, “which would you rather have more, the current content that no one sees, or more focused content that everyone sees?” That’s usually enough to make the point. My approach to SEO is similar to my approach to content. We define a theme, and then match that theme to a focus keyword. Thanks for reading!

  • http://twitter.com/sharithurow sharithurow

    Oooh! Theming and aboutness are not the same thing. Please read: http://searchengineland.com/keywords-aboutness-seo-49210

  • http://twitter.com/jennyhalasz Jenny Halasz

    Interesting article Shari. My goal is to communicate concepts like this in simple terms that the average layperson can understand. While your article was detailed, it was filled with jargon and “new” concepts that I think might be a little much for my target audience. :)

  • http://twitter.com/markjohnh Mark John Hiemstra

    I like when writers can break down complex topics into their most simple elements. There is obviously a lot more that goes into this practice than just these elements, but breaking it down into starting points like this is great, not just for beginners, but for anyone who needs a gentle reminder every now and then about starting points. Consider Hemingway’s four rules of writing. There’s a lot more that goes into a novel, but start with those and you’re on your way. Well done, Jenny.

  • Caitlin Durand

    I
    agree with you Chris – Content should make the audience want to do
    something. The chart you have added is a simple way to understand the
    top to bottom flow. Making sure the content is going to be relevant for
    the audience is key. Your points are concise and helpful ways for a site
    owner to get to an end goal by compiling all the questions they should
    ask themselves before deciding to create a page. Thanks for the read Jenny – Very informative!

  • http://twitter.com/jennyhalasz Jenny Halasz

    Thank you very much! That’s a very nice compliment and feedback.

  • http://twitter.com/jennyhalasz Jenny Halasz

    Thank you very much! That’s a very nice compliment and feedback.

  • Ocha Nix

    There’s lots of stuff to digest here. Like the timing issue. I suppose it is best to have a good mix of longevity and current events in your content.

  • gusvdw45

    Thank you for the post!

    It will help with my quest to get my blog’s content into a better space while optimizing it at the same time!

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100001350492169 Hoang Nguyen

    You have a great diagram to share. Thank you so much! It’s very useful for newcomer on SEO.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100001350492169 Hoang Nguyen

    Don’t forget the customers are the human and you’ll have a good looking from Google.

  • Peter

    Great Article, it makes a lot of sense and is something i will put into consideration next time I am optimizing a web site.

    Business: http://www.shimmertechno.com
    Blog: http://pgiammarco.blogspot.com