Google: Adding Too Many Pages Too Quickly May Flag A Site To Be Reviewed Manually

google-pages-flagGoogle’s Matt Cutts answered a question submitted by another Googler, John Mueller, on YouTube asking, “Should I add an archive of hundreds of thousands of pages all at once or in stages?”

The question is, if you build out a new section of your website with tons of content – is it safe to just launch them all at once or should you do smaller chunks at a time?

Matt said that Google can handle it either way, but he did say that if a site released hundreds of thousands of pages overnight, it may raise a red flag and warrant a manual review by the Google spam team. And if you do not want Google to manually review your site and you don’t want to draw attention to your site – you may not want to release too many pages too quickly.

Here is the video:

Matt said that if you can slowly roll them out in larger blocks but not all of them at once, then do it that way. If not, it should be fine, but someone at Google may manually review it. He also added that it is rare to see a site release so many new pages and for all those pages to all be unique and of good quality. He didn’t say it was impossible.

Related Topics: Channel: SEO | Google: SEO | Top News

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About The Author: is Search Engine Land's News Editor and owns RustyBrick, a NY based web consulting firm. He also runs Search Engine Roundtable, a popular search blog on very advanced SEM topics. Barry's personal blog is named Cartoon Barry and he can be followed on Twitter here. For more background information on Barry, see his full bio over here.

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  • http://twitter.com/benlanders benlanders

    There’s a litmus test to guide your SEO efforts… “would you still to XYZ if Matt Cutts and the manual webspam team where going to put your website on the big screen in the conference room and review it?”

  • Agata

    In a fairly big city, is not unusual that realtor releases all at once 10s of thousand of pages, mostly property pages when connecting to their local MLS db for the 1st time.And then have another tens or hundreds pages added daily.
    I would imagine same situation with online store with hundreds of products.

  • http://furiousgryphon.com/ Thomas Oeser

    The followup question would be how long does it take to get a manual review?

  • a1brandz

    I have never had such situation But I think mostly e-commerce sites do upload thousands of pages at once and this is a bad news for them.

  • writenow

    Gee, ya think?

  • http://www.satinderspace.com/ Satinder Singh

    I know That’s Why I always schedule my blog posts :)

  • http://www.nathanielbailey.co.uk/ Nathaniel Bailey

    Nice Q&A but what’s the “magic” number of “too many” pages which may raise a red flag to the G spam team? I doubt that many sites would hit it, but it would be nice to know just how many new products etc is safe for clients to add in one hit before google feels the need to manually check them all?!

  • http://www.facebook.com/mathias.burmeister Mathias Burmeister

    SEO ranking aside, in a bizarre kind of way it almost is an honor to have your website manually reviewed by Matt Cutts and his team ;)

  • http://www.socialbakers.com/events/engage Anne Goulding

    Well, if you add a new section of your website with hundreds of new pages and content and you are sure that your practices are legitimate, then I don’t get what’s the worry? Does it really matter when their spam team will check it, if you are sure they are correct, legitimate and unique?

  • http://www.searchinfluence.com/author/jpeyton/ Jay Peyton

    I guess if you’re interested in spamming the internet, you should slow down your evil masterplan a little bit. I can see this being applicable to a lot of article directories. Most of them are “on the run” now. They just buy up domains with some solid pagerank and set up shop with the same database from their old directory that tanked. And then they do it again when they tank that domain. So, honestly, cheers to the search quality team on this policy.

  • http://www.spinxwebdesign.com/ Alan Smith

    Can anybody please suggest me how many unique and good quality pages we can serve for Google at a time?

  • David Rodriguez

    Thnaks for sharing.
    Now, we need to now which is the limit. 5 weekly? 10?
    It depend on the competition with the keyword?

  • Lucia Jordan

    Surely the Google team would take a different view on FMCG e-commerce sites – it would be obvious on a manual check, surely? We could do with a real case study on this?

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