• http://www.planetc1.com/ chiropractic

    I notice that change.gov is ranking for “change”. A move in the right direction.

  • Michael Gray

    I think we should leave it the way it is, make this an example for people who try to game the system without knowing the repercussions of their actions, citizens need to learn to take responsibility for their action too.

    Ron Paul FTW!!!

  • cryptblade

    I think it should be kept the way it is. “Miserable failure” is not Bush’s legacy, it’s Google and Googlebombing’s legacy.

    I also think it’s a lesson for the public.

    Just because you think Bush is a failure or you think this type of effect is funny, doesn’t make vigilante action right. There’s a reason why in the real world vigilantes are not welcomed and are legal – because mob-mentality, vigilante and lynchmobs are almost always wrong. Just because something is done in cyberspace doesn’t mean it’s right or should be legal as well.

    To disagree with the policies of the government and to voice that disagreement is a constitutional right. However, taking action beyond voicing your opinion in the real world means risking breaking the law. Google bombing is the cyberspace equivalent of assaulting a person in the real world.

    It’s hard to grasp this right now, but with increasing cases of “cyber-bulling” and as the newer generations grow up having been completely immersed between real life and cyber life, the lines are blurred. For example, in real life cases such as the myspace mom Lori Drew who’s cyber actions led to the suicide of a teen girl, the ramifications of cyberspace to real life are real.

    Take also, for example, the steady increase in interest over “reputation management”. Companies are realizing that their reputation online, in searches, have real life ramifications. There are some companies who lose out on thousands or millions of dollars if they have any poor reputation remarks online.

    “miserable failure” needs to be kept as a reminder of the danger of cyberspace vigilantism.

  • paisley

    see i wasn’t the only one mistaken about miserable failure.. (see above)

    FYI… here’s a GUESS, think Obama and CMS.. same page won’t be there. so me thinks your problem will be solved.

  • malersteffi

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    To disagree with the policies of the government and to voice that disagreement is a constitutional right. However, ecowelt.de taking action beyond voicing your opinion in the real world means risking breaking the law. Google bombing is the cyberspace equivalent of assaulting a person in the real world.

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