• Colby

    Definitely agree that PPC landing pages can be a driver for new website pages. Our experience has been that because of the “if we can throw a landing page up quickly we can start making money” mentality of the PPC teams when it comes to new ad groups, the pace of creating new landing pages far exceeds that of creating new pages on the site. And that is not such a bad thing. Given most organizations’ need to prioritize resources, the performance of new PPC landing pages can be assessed to determine if it makes sense to replicate or expand the content on the main site, and this can lead to a natural prioritization of site content development efforts. Add to that feeding the highest performing PPC keywords into the website content plan, and you can really start to focus in on what content will be most interesting (and profitable) for your target audience.

  • Mambo Man

    Good stuff- thanks.

    re: Cannibalization Prevention

    Don’t you think it’s almost impossible to know that you’re always ranking #1 in organic serps? Plus you have to keep track of variants, devices, partners, the landing page, etc…

    IMO- Bid to a point where the GP/ROI is optimized like any other terms. When nobody else is bidding, the CPC’s are often very low.

    Plus you get to control the message, sitelinks and any of the other stuff Google decides to display. You’re owning more SERP real estate which is often worth the price- IMO.

    Also, I often see higher conversion rates for CPC Ads even when we own a #1 organic position. This also allows you to go back to the SEO guys and say, “Hey, this is working for PPC. Is there anything you can do to improve the organic messaging/experience?”

    I’d be interested to hear your opinions.

    Thanks!

  • Martin Pezet

    A fascinating article which really got me thinking. I have always been an avid supporter of having one Search Marketing team with staff which have specialisms in either SEO or PPC but that have a grounding in the other discipline too. They should sit closely, but separately, to the Web Analysts, Content/PR and the Social Media Teams (should they exist) due to the frequent link ups required.

    I found it interesting that your conclusion is that they should be separate teams but throughout the article you talk of frequent collaboration between the two teams… wouldn’t it just be easier if they were one team then? As I mentioned at the start, it doesn’t stop you having differently skilled staff within that team. I would infact be aghast if SEO & PPC specialists were only collaborating once a year on a number of the points that you outline though whether they were in one team or two. Depending on the size of the company and traffic through to the website(s), it should be far more frequently than this.

    The most important point I always make though is that it never ceases to amaze me how little some reasonably digitally savvy people know about Search. Having worked extensively for a FTSE100 company there are highly skilled digital and/or business professionals who simply dont know what search is. Sure they know Google, and they know the words, and often try and talk-the-talk, but really they don’t understand the intricate differences between paid and organic search and if you separate the teams they will often talk to the wrong people. Search belongs together, a hub of Google expertese within a business, with an ambassador knowledgeable in both to lead the team and drive it’s importance within the business.

    Ideally I advocate in-house knowledge with agencies only being used as an extra nice-to-have resource. No one will understand the company, and their objectives, like an in-house team.

  • Emergency Pizza Party

    “If no one is bidding on a keyword and you’re ranking #1 for it organically, then there will be some cannibalization if you decide to bid on it (i.e. there is a good chance that 1+1= 1.5).

    Relative to the rest of the account and lacking competition these are usually low-priced efficient keywords nonetheless.

  • Andreas Mitschke

    You’ve also full control about the content displayed in organic listings – in terms of accuracy and control, PPC and organic content are similar.

    As the article already pointed out, there is no magical standard tactic X,which works for every offer. In your case, your target audience seems to be influenced by a higher rate of exposure, hence higher conversion when PPC and SERP #1 are simultaneously displayed – may be a kind of unconscious trust signal.

    Synergizing SEO and PPC is always required and has always been “normal” in my world as you’re way faster with testing CPC copy than you are with A/B testing content. However, it’ll just give you a guide value for in-depth content ideas, but that should be enough already.

  • Guest

    A fascinating article which really got me thinking. I have always been an avid supporter of having one Search Marketing team with staff which have specialisms in either SEO or PPC but that have a grounding in the other discipline too. They should sit closely, but separately, to the Web Analysts, Content/PR and the Social Media Teams (should they exist) due to the frequent link ups required.

    I found it interesting that your conclusion is that they should be separate teams but throughout the article you talk of frequent collaboration between the two teams… wouldn’t it just be easier if they were one team then? As I mentioned at the start, it doesn’t stop you having differently skilled staff within that team. I would infact be aghast if SEO & PPC specialists were only collaborating once a year on a number of the points that you outline though whether they were in one team or two. Depending on the size of the company and traffic through to the website(s), it should be far more frequently than this.

    The most important point I always make though is that it never ceases to amaze me how little some reasonably digitally savvy people know about Search. Having worked extensively for a FTSE100 company there are highly skilled digital and/or business professionals who simply dont know what search is. Sure they know Google, and they know the words, and often try and talk-the-talk, but really they don’t understand the intricate differences between paid and organic search and if you separate the teams they will often talk to the wrong people. Search belongs together, a hub of Google expertese within a business, with an ambassador knowledgeable in both to lead the team and drive it’s importance within the business.

    Ideally I advocate in-house knowledge with agencies only being used as an extra nice-to-have resource. No one will understand the company, and their objectives, like an in-house team.

  • tedives

    Martin – if you had to choose three points to be the most aghast at, regarding infrequency, which three would those be? Just curious.

  • Martin Pezet

    The “one-times” I’d be doing every 6 months and the “yearly” at least quarterly. Integrated marketing strategies do not come to fruition with people working in silos for me. Search is already in danger of becoming a silo within marketing, I’d not be making that worse by splitting up paid & organic within the same organisation.

  • jenvisser

    I agree with you here and we pitch to our clients that the two should go hand in hand and influence each other regularly. We tend to be hired for PPC management first, but we include organic recommendations in our monthly reports when we identify high performing keywords. If we have an SEO contract + PPC we will start working on page optimization or new page content right away, if we don’t have both contracts and the client doesn’t have in-house capabilities, it generally becomes new business for us as they see the opportunities that they are missing.