• http://www.redstarcreative.co.uk/ Andy Kinsey

    Great Post,

    I’ve noticed a trend recently when i register with certain registrars (primarily 123reg) that within a few hours I get an email from a third party congratulating me on the site and asking me if I want to get it submitted to Google and Bing for £100.

    Now being a digital marketer myself I say no and think nothing of it, other than being annoyed my details are clearly being passed on annoyingly. But those who know nothing may think its from the registrar just being nice and say yes, boom £100 gone for a few minutes work.

    This and cold calling are the bain of my life, especially yell – though you can have fun tripping up cold callers and getting them to admit they are just selling ~PPC and dont have a “special relationship” with Google.

    Anyway great post, keep pushing this.

  • dianekulseth

    It’s sad that there still have to be posts about this, but I’ve seen my fair share both working with clients and for my own personal websites. I can’t tell you how many times I’d get mailings telling me that I need to pay $150+ to register my site with the search engines.

    Hopefully the word will continue to spread about these scammers so companies can rest assured that they’re working with good SEO knowledge when they hire someone.

  • http://www.horse-and-carriage-hire.co.uk/ Asian Wedding Horses

    My favourites are the calls I get from People asking me if I want my sites on Google. When I ask them where they get my number from and they say from Google I always have a good chuckle.

  • http://wtff.com/ JustConsumer

    This is poorly written article, full of the misleading statements.
    Buyers Beware of such “professionals”.

  • Scott Avery

    Don’t you mean poor-”ly” written article?

  • http://wtff.com/ JustConsumer

    Yup, tks )

  • http://www.LeadDiscovery.com/ Jerry Nordstrom

    Everyone has made good points on the impact of the Whois/Adwords ad scrape and scam companies, but I’ll lay down one more that irks me.

    These types of “services” have been out there for years influencing small business owners ideas about SEO with their pitch. Business owners have been slowly accepting these deceptive offers as some gauge of what SEO services cost. We hear a common objection when delivering a quote, “But I can get a company to do this for $250 – $500/month.

    Granted, a customer only willing to spend $250 is not our target, but we try and enlighten them all the same.

  • http://www.shop.graciousstore.com/ Gracious Store

    There aremany ill minded SEO companies out there who who make false and empty promises to website owners with hope of gaining their trust, but unfortunately many of their lies and empty promises are backfiring on them

  • Kevin Anchi

    excellent post and 100% true, i myself has conducted an survey in 6 months for 20 seo agencies and noticed the same thing

    but i was very happy doing so..
    cause (secret)

  • http://rafaelmarquez.me/ Rafael Marquez

    My “favorite” is when the reply email is a gmail or yahoo address. That’s how you know they are pros at what they do.

  • Romil Tripathi

    great post

    your post is very accurate

    your rankings are dependent on quality links back to your site. No links = no rankings.

  • ChamanaOficial

    We were contacted by ‘Google’ saying that they could remove some bad reputation links the company had (such as ripoffreport, etc) completely remove them from their search engine for $5,000 USD. True story, they are already approaching as Google themselves.

  • Nirjhar Lo

    I want to say something here…
    With little training and reading most of the documents on seo by google, anybody can optimize own site.
    At least that’s my experience of working with sites in a legitimate way.

    Dependence on such silly seo schemes and expecting some magic, will be total loss for small business.

  • Nirjhar Lo

    I want to say something here…
    With little training and reading most of the documents on seo by google, anybody can optimize own site.
    At least that’s my experience of working with sites in a legitimate way.

    Dependence on such silly seo schemes and expecting some magic, will be total loss for small business.

  • http://www.brickmarketing.com/ Nick Stamoulis

    In the last month or so we have heard from 3 or 4 people like “Nick” there. I also get a bunch of emails telling me how poorly my website is doing and how they can help me get my website to the top of the SERPs. It’s so irritating that folks like that still exist because they only further sully the reputation of the SEO industry. These con men take advantage of unsuspecting site owners, making it harder for them to trust us the next time.

  • Scott Davis

    There’s a joint out of New York City that does something very similar… But with Google+ pages. They’ll try to verify your Google+ page with their account & PIN number when they see a new Google+ page go up (the PIN mailer is addressed to the business owner — just like the legitimate PIN mail requested — which makes it quite difficult to know if it’s the PIN you actually requested or a scammers), and then once they’ve had you verify THEIR control over your Google+ listing, they offer to “sell” the rights back to you for a not-so-small monthly fee while claiming to “put you on google maps”. When they call, they even initially claim to be Google… until you specifically ask them who they work for (and then they hang up on you).

    While anyone familiar with Google+, Places & Maps knows this is a free service from Google… Most small business owners do not and fall for this black-hat style of marketing tactic.