• Scott Pittman

    The search volume for phrase and exact (and broad) is the same – it’s just the exact match search volume that is shown. If anyone actually finds a way to get search volume for different match types then please share. . unless I’ve missed something?

    Thanks

  • Scott Pittman

    The search volume for phrase and exact (and broad) is the same – it’s just the exact match search volume that is shown. If anyone actually finds a way to get search volume for different match types then please share. . unless I’ve missed something?

    Thanks

  • http://www.inmediaconcepts.co.nz/ William John

    A long process to uncover not provided data, but still it makes sense putting the effort to pull the data when it’s available and fresh.

  • http://www.inmediaconcepts.co.nz/ William John

    A long process to uncover not provided data, but still it makes sense putting the effort to pull the data when it’s available and fresh.

  • Scotts Contracting

    This makes me really question how #google is really trying to help the small business industry.

  • Scotts Contracting

    This makes me really question how #google is really trying to help the small business industry.

  • https://plus.google.com/117626320669881683246/ Bradley G. Smith

    Scott, I’m glad you asked this question. I can see you’re actively using Google Keyword Planner. I covered how to calculate phrase and exact search volume in the post. I’ll probably try to write a blog post on this in the near future so you can see the reasoning behind the methodology. The trick is to utilize daily impressions. When you download the data from Google Keyword Planner, ‘Estimated Impressions’ (vs provided search volume) are unique to phrase and exact (and broad) match terms. Step #3 from the blog post covers the calculation (refer to this step in the post for the process). The formulas for calculating phrase and exact are below (they are also in the Formulas section of the post).

    Formulas:
    Search Volume Exact
    1) Exact Monthly Search Impressions: (Exact Daily Impressions * 365)/12
    2) Exact % of Search Volume: Exact Monthly Search Impressions/(Exact Monthly Search Impressions + Phrase Monthly Search Impressions)
    3) Search Volume Exact: Exact % of Search Volume * Google Provided Search Volume

    Search Volume Phrase
    1) Phrase Monthly Search Impressions: (Phrase Daily Impressions * 365)/12
    2) Phrase % of Search Volume: Phrase Monthly Search Impressions/(Exact Monthly Search Impressions + Phrase Monthly Search Impressions)
    3) Search Volume Phrase: Phrase % of Search Volume * Google Provided Search Volume

    Again, I’ll try to write a post on this in the near future so I can share my detailed reasoning on the methodology provided here.

  • https://plus.google.com/117626320669881683246/ Bradley G. Smith

    Scott, I’m glad you asked this question. I can see you’re actively using Google Keyword Planner. I covered how to calculate phrase and exact search volume in the post. I’ll probably try to write a blog post on this in the near future so you can see the reasoning behind the methodology. The trick is to utilize daily impressions. When you download the data from Google Keyword Planner, ‘Estimated Impressions’ (vs provided search volume) are unique to phrase and exact (and broad) match terms. Step #3 from the blog post covers the calculation (refer to this step in the post for the process). The formulas for calculating phrase and exact are below (they are also in the Formulas section of the post).

    Formulas:
    Search Volume Exact
    1) Exact Monthly Search Impressions: (Exact Daily Impressions * 365)/12
    2) Exact % of Search Volume: Exact Monthly Search Impressions/(Exact Monthly Search Impressions + Phrase Monthly Search Impressions)
    3) Search Volume Exact: Exact % of Search Volume * Google Provided Search Volume

    Search Volume Phrase
    1) Phrase Monthly Search Impressions: (Phrase Daily Impressions * 365)/12
    2) Phrase % of Search Volume: Phrase Monthly Search Impressions/(Exact Monthly Search Impressions + Phrase Monthly Search Impressions)
    3) Search Volume Phrase: Phrase % of Search Volume * Google Provided Search Volume

    Again, I’ll try to write a post on this in the near future so I can share my detailed reasoning on the methodology provided here.

  • http://www.zldoty.com/ Zach Doty

    Scott, good question. I’d like to follow up to Brad & expound on his response bit. From my understanding, the question is a bit unclear – my understanding and corresponding answer assumes you’re talking about match types in Google Keyword planner.

    In Google Keyword Planner, you can edit the match types in the “Your Plan” section on the right of the screen. Click the pencil and you can change match types as desired.

    If you’re referring to the end result of getting broad match data, I would encourage you to consider the principles of conservatism in data estimation / forecasting. From your perspective, would you want to reflect the highest amount of data or the most accurate data? I think it touches a bit too on managing expectations in your client or stakeholder relationships.

  • http://www.zldoty.com/ Zach Doty

    William, you’re absolutely right. Consider this, all of these updates are a knell for shortsighted marketers and a windfall for above-board practitioners/strategists.There are a number of SEO automation platforms which are performing this (for a fee, of course) and you could probably string together this data automatically if you have Adwords API access and strung together Excel templates or Macros. Hope that helps.

  • http://www.LeadDiscovery.com/ Jerry Nordstrom

    Why does keyword data have to be encrypted? NSA or NASDAQ?

    Can’t KW data be extracted from log files – Should we not go old-school?

    How can Google Glass data be less invasive than keyword data?

    Many will proclaim that the future of Internet marketing is based upon analysis and insertion of our companies into the real-time consumer data stream or “holistic marketing”. This is true, but the ugly red-headed step child at Thanksgiving here is data privacy. If consumers are given control of their personal data what happens to this model that so many tech companies have bet their bean bag laden gaming rooms on?

  • http://www.zldoty.com/ Zach Doty

    Jerry, it’s probably somewhere between privacy from the NSA, Adwords & Google Analytics Premium sales. Keyword data cannot be extracted from log files. Consider this, the Google keyword data was water coming from a well, (in G Analytics) via a faucet in the kitchen. Google has encrypted the URL and data, so they’ve effectively sandbagged our metaphorical well. :-) Moving to another room of the house won’t help when the well is closed. Does that make sense?

    The question of consumers and data privacy another beast. Also, if you’re interested in the Google sales aspect, I believe Slingshot SEO (aka Digital Relevance) published an interesting post on Google’s efforts to extract one last year of YOY revenue percentage increases, or something to that effect. Perhaps Brad could furnish you the link.

  • http://tweetphiladelphia.com/ Eric Van Buskirk

    I work at SEMrush. Great peice, but please note we update data daily and at the MOST weekly. It’s not a month old.

  • https://plus.google.com/117626320669881683246/ Bradley G. Smith

    Eric, thanks for the update. I just spoke with another employee of SEMRush and was coming to make a note on the post. Thanks for the correction and clarification.

    I’m told that in the case of some keywords the data is updated even more than once a day. And, this underscores my point even more, SEMRush can be utilized to build a relevant, fresh, up-to-date irrefutable keyword list.

  • rituraj

    why not just use the webmaster tools instead to get the KWs and the CTR

  • https://plus.google.com/117626320669881683246/ Bradley G. Smith

    rituraj, good question. As I’m sure you’ve already seen from this post, http://googlewebmastercentral.blogspot.com/2011/10/webmaster-tools-search-queries-data-is.html, those reports from GWT are now in Google Analytics. In these reports, Google does not directly correlate keyword data with landing page data. As of right now, Google keeps those reports separate. So, reporting on keyword-specific organic traffic to a landing page from those reports is not currently possible.

  • http://dannybrown.me/ Danny Brown

    Would something like Woopra counter this, if used as a main analytics platform? Or are they based around the same “limitations” (for want of a better word) that the new GA set-up dictates?