Search Wikia Gets Open Source Categorization Software

Hot on the heels of last week’s acquisition of the Grub open source crawler technology, Wikia announced today that Intellisophic has agreed to make its categorization software available via open source in conjunction with the Search Wikia project. From the press release: Categorization is the process of organizing information based on a common set of […]

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Hot on the heels of last week’s acquisition of the Grub open source crawler technology, Wikia announced today that Intellisophic has agreed to make its categorization software available via open source in conjunction with the Search Wikia project.

From the press release:

Categorization is the process of organizing information based on a common set of characteristics or concepts, which in terms of Internet searching helps to increase accuracy. By understanding the vocabularies, terminology and relationships of concepts in different categories of content such as finance, gaming, or news, the quality of search results for the related keywords can be significantly increased.

“The Web is an amazing collection of human knowledge, unfortunately it is unorganized, and that can lead to frustration for businesses, researchers, students, etc.,” said Michael Hoey, chief executive officer, Intellisophic. “We believe everyone will benefit from the availability of more robust tools and share Wikia’s vision that search, and the entire web experience, can be improved through collaboration.”

In an effort to better Internet search for everyone, Intellisophic has agreed to open source its engine and make it available for any search application built using Wikia’s search tools.


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Chris Sherman
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Chris Sherman (@CJSherman) is a Founding editor of Search Engine Land and is now retired.

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