• http://twitter.com/onreact_com Tad Chef

    Yeah, that’s very probable. The organic content will be pushed even farther down and the eye will focus on the left ads first. 

  • Nanda Kishore

    If I have to take a guess, that open white space will probably be used for promoting product listings as part of the new commercialization of Google Shopping. The white space allows for better product views with imagery and may possibly encourage advertisers to bid better in Adwords. Alternately, that white space may also be used for keywords-based text ads as their original position in Google search results will be taken up by product ads. 
    http://ecommerceproductmanager.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/google-shopping-bidding-your-way-to-the-customers-wallet/

  • http://www.webstatsart.com/ Webstats Art

    Maybe it will be filled with Google Plus links

  • http://twitter.com/AshishKothari Ashish Kothari

    Not a good news for the advertisers – because if the ads stay at their current spots (top and right sidebar), there would be more “accidental clicks on the ads”. So while it will help Google make more money from that navigation interface, advertisers would have to pay more for clicks that were not intentional.

  • http://twitter.com/_asheridan Andy Sheridan

    Personally I think the organic listings stand out more in Barry’s mockup than they do right now

  • http://twitter.com/JonDBishop Jon Bishop

    Is this going to become a trend? Wait until users become comfortable with specific functionality and then replace that functionality with an ad.

  • Stephen Sevenyoln

    Then they’re copying Bing

  • johndxx

     Ashish,

    These won’t replace the top ads. The top ads will remain because Google doesn’t care about accidental clicks. It wants them. This is why the background on those top ads is so weak.

  • johndxx

     Don’t worry, once you place 3-4 top ads and a few YouTube videos in there, you won’t see them any longer.

  • http://twitter.com/itsabhik Abhik Biswas

    Seems fake, but it looks cool.

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/Y7Q532MDH3YZ7C5XK2BDT7G6UE Katharine

    My ńeighboŕ’s mŏther-iń-ląw Maḱes $8O houŕly on the laptoṗ. She has bėėn out of w0rḱ for 7 Ṁonths but ląst Ṁonth her ińcome wąs $8734 just worḱińg on thė laṖt0Ṗ for a ƒew hours. Gŏ to this web siṫe and ŕead morė.. Ca&#115hLazy.com

  • http://2.gp/p7Nu Manuela R. Gatlin

    advertisers would have to pay more for clicks that were not intentional. http://DemoforFrank.blogspot.com

  • robthespy

     Who says users were comfortable w/ it?
    Whatever the change is I think we can all agree that it will mean higher CTR and more G+ integration.  :p

  • http://twitter.com/wseabrook William Seabrook

    Hmm a big whiff of commerce methinks. Nice mock up though – we shall see!

    Cheers,
    William
    http://seabrook-associates.com

  • http://www.OfInteresttoMe.com/ Matt

    I saw this last night. I kinda like it, I hope it sticks around.

  • http://www.buzzmaven.com/ Scott Clark

    Golden UI Triangle FTW!

  • http://twitter.com/AshishKothari Ashish Kothari

    You are right John. Remember the days when the distinction between paid and organic listings was nice and clear. But now with that background reduced to the lightest shade of orange, Google is telling searchers that all those results are in fact same and are merit based.

    However if you are searching for something and click on a paid listing it might still be relevant to your search. But with the interface Barry just showed us, you might accidentally click on a paid listing that’s totally irrelevant to what you intended.

    Do advertisers have a voice? (as a matter of fact, I haven’t come across the new interface yet)