Adjusting Your SEO Strategies During Panda & Penguin

For the past few months, I have been practically living in an analytics dashboard, constantly monitoring my clients’ organic search data for even the smallest hint of a Google slap. If you haven’t noticed, Google has been busy updating their search products (see: NovDecJan, Feb, Mar).

On top of those changes that they have publicly documented, we are also seeing additional SEO-specific updates by Google. We’ve had a “page layout algorithm” update, Panda updates and even a bug in Google’s system that caused sites to accidentally be delisted.

Now, there’s a Penguin in the mix. Pandas, Penguins and bugs – Oh my! It’s like I’m at the zoo. And a zoo is pretty much what the SEO world feels like right now.

Also in the mix was the Matt Cutts announcement about a penalty for overly-optimized sites. And then a few weeks later, we started hearing more and more about ‘negative SEO’, which is essentially the process of sabotaging someone’s organic search rankings by generating tens of thousands of “bad” links to their website.

That is really sad, but apparently, there is evidence that it can work (although some people predict it will only work in specific situations, such as sites that already have suspicious link profiles). Yeah. Let that sink in. SEOs targeting SEOs. It makes me sick.

If you remember the good old days, you remember when Google would make one big change every once in a while. Rarely was it several major changes at once, and algorithm updates that had massive SEO implications were even more rare. The infrequency of major algorithm updates made it much easier to identify and measure the impact to rankings and all other metrics.

The best SEOs would figure out which factors changed and/or which factors had received more or less weight and then adjust their sites accordingly. This is not the case today. Lately, SEO is more like an gun fight where the dust never settles.

All Is Fair In The Land Of SEO?

Do you see that? Is Matt Cutts launching another algo update?

Do you see that? Is Matt Cutts launching another algo update?

As I mentioned earlier, SEOs are now living in a zoo, where every day feels like an adventure in controlled chaos. And with ‘negative SEO’, we’ve got a situation where SEOs are basically trying to eat each other. So instead of a zoo, maybe it’s more like Jurassic Park.

With Google’s Panda and Penguin updates affecting so many sites, I’m paranoid that my sites might be next.

One moment, I’m seeing a minor fluctuation in my traffic, and it’s like I’m hearing the footsteps while staring at the water rippling in the cup on the dashboard. Then, I feel like I’m riding in the jeep with Jeff Goldblum as we try to outrun the tyrannosaurus rex. And I’m a white hat! I’m the good guy!

I’m building fresh, quality content. I’m spending hours and hours researching market trends and creating value for my site’s visitors. I’m *not* buying thousands of links on private blog networks. Rather, I’m spending time contacting webmasters of websites related to my niche to advertise and build contextual links that make sense for my site.

I’m active on the social media front. I’ve invested in usability, information architecture and landing page optimization. But none of that matters because lately it seems like Google is targeting blackhat SEOs, but in the process they are affecting whitehats and blackhats alike.

I can’t help but think that there have been quite a few false positives related to Panda and Penguin. In fact, it must be a high number, as Google created a form to complain that your site was unfairly targeted.

Google may be targeting spammers and blackhats, but they are also inadvertently chasing people who actually care about their websites’ value, content, and overall marketing campaign. Google shows no sign of slowing down.

In that classic scene from Jurassic Park, the T-rex chases the jeep for awhile and then gives up. I can only hope that Google does the same. At least give us a chance to catch our breath.

Don't move! He can't see us if we don't move.

Don't move! He can't see us if we don't move.

So we’re living with Panda, Penguin, and all the other updates going live every week. Sometimes I think I’d feel safer if I just didn’t move. Maybe Google won’t see me if I don’t do anything at all. But I can’t do that. I’m not going to live like that. But I will be smarter about everything that I do and recommend.

So where do we go from here? Below are some tips for moving forward and getting settled on your piece of land in the SEO zoo.

Link Building

If you are managing SEO and link building for a big brand, I recommend ceasing all paid link building campaigns. I’m sure I’ll take some heat for that recommendation, but I just can’t recommend paid link building to big brands right now. It’s just too risky at this point in time.

If you have a knowledgeable, experienced link builder working for you and you haven’t been slapped by Google in any of the recent updates, then you are probably okay.

However, it’s still a big risk, especially when you consider what you are risking. But if you’ve got money burning a hole in your pocket and if you must insist on maintaining some form of paid link building, here is my advice:

  • Stop building exact match anchor links.

According to pretty much everyone, this is the biggest red flag in the land of links. If all of your links say ‘blue widget’ because you want to rank for ‘blue widget’, then Google will eventually punish you. It’s just not natural to have all of your links be exact match anchor text. You should be diversifying the anchor text, focusing more on links that mention your brand and less on links that mention non-branded keywords.

Don’t balk at links that say Read More, Here, or www.yourdomain.com. Having these types of links will make your link graph look more organic (pun intended).

  • Make your link building consistently inconsistent.

For example, if you have a budget of $2,000/month, then you are probably building a set amount of links each week or each month. And when Google looks at your link growth, what they’ll notice is that your link count is growing by the same number each month.

This type of is link velocity is unnatural, especially if you’re buying all the links from one network. It’s easy for Google to notice this type of paid link growth because Google is smart. So be more like a MLB pitcher: throw some fast balls and some change-ups. Don’t make it easy for Google to find a pattern in your link growth.

  • Diversify the quality (read: PageRank) of the sites you are buying links from.

If you are only buying links on sites with PR1 and higher, it is easy for Google to detect because that is unnatural. Obviously, you want to get links from sites with PR here and there, but don’t strictly focus on that factor.

Be very selective in your paid link placement. Diversify your paid link portfolio. Go for a range of sites that are big, small, popular, unpopular, no PR, higher PR, etc. Also, don’t be afraid to buy nofollow links. Don’t ignore potential links from social media sites like Twitter and Facebook. However, as you get more selective, be ready to spend more on links.

  • Buy a site/blog instead of buying links on a site/blog.

Buying a blog can be a much more effective use of your money in the long run. You’ll get a lot more value than just the links, and you won’t run the risks of being penalized for buying paid links.

  • Find all the free links that you already have.

Get familiar with your 404 reports, log files, and broken internal links. Check Webmaster Tools. Look for any indication of internal and/or inbound links pointing to inactive URLs. Look for links that are being 302 redirected to a final URL. Also look for URLs that are going through multiple redirects. Make sure all links are finding their ways to your active pages without passing through 302 redirects or some sort of redirect chain.

When I’m beginning a new SEO campaign, it never ceases to amaze me how many broken links I find in Webmaster Tools accounts. Sometimes the numbers is in the thousands. These are free links! These are free links that you earned! Make sure they are 301 redirected to active URLs!

Creating Content

Because paid links are a little too risky for me right now, I’d recommend moving the majority of any paid link budgets over to the budget for content creation. And when it comes to content creation, here are some of the ways you can spend money to add unique content and value to your site:

  • Write how-to guides
  • Develop infographics
  • Dust off the old corporate blog and start publishing new content on a daily basis
  • Build microsites
  • Build new landing pages
  • Create a buying guide for your most popular product categories
  • Write weekly press releases
  • Create video reviews of your products

The thing about great content is that it will generate links. But more importantly, great content will add more value to your site’s visitors. Just be sure to promote your new content. Encourage your visitors and customers to share your content and products.

In the end, you may be surprised that you get more bang for your buck with rankings via content creation than paid link campaigns. Also, the lessons you learn with content are priceless. It can really help to educate entire businesses about what their website visitors are looking for, enjoy, dislike, prefer, etc. You can use that information to make your site better overall.

Obviously, I could also include an entire section in here about the importance of being active on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+. But I’ll leave that to the social media folks.

I could also write a how-to guide outlining the importance of AgentRank and setting up the rel=author and rel=me tags for all your authors and contributers, as a recent study reported that 17% of SERPs are showing author integrations. But this post is already getting too long. So maybe I can write about that next time.

"That's right, Sam Neill. I would make an awesome SEO." - Jeff Goldblum

"That's right, Sam Neill. I would make an awesome SEO." - Jeff Goldblum

In the meantime, hang in there. Be smart. Be cautious. If you can, wait for some of the dust to settle before you make any moves that could in any way risk your search rankings.

As Jeff Goldblum puts it in the movie: “I’m simply saying that life, uh, finds a way.

As an SEO living in the days of Pandas and Penguins, I, too, will find a way.

Remember that in the end, Jeff Goldblum makes it out of Jurassic Park alive.

So if you’re stuck and needing help making a decision about your SEO campaign, just ask yourself: What would Jeff Goldblum do?

Opinions expressed in the article are those of the guest author and not necessarily Search Engine Land.

Related Topics: All Things SEO Column | Channel: SEO

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About The Author: is Chief Traffic Officer at PMG, a full-service digital agency, where he directs all technical operations for the company, including the company’s SEO, social media, local search, reputation management, website architecture and usability, analytics and Wordpress practices. Follow him on Twitter @kerrydean.

Connect with the author via: Email | Twitter | Google+ | LinkedIn



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  • Dali Burgado

    Love the “Make your link building consistently inconsistent” advice. Though, I would completely advise against any paid link building especially after the BuildMyRank fiasco.

  • robthespy

    Google is Parsons. And I am Bruce Lee!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o_Ycw0d_Uow

  • http://twitter.com/PhilCaines Phil Caines

    Great article. Getting past blog networks is a positive move forward for the Internet, but it will be painful, good job providing transitional tactics to help ease the pain a bit. It’s kind of like when they restarted the power in Jurassic Park and Timmy went flying off the fence.

  • http://www.facebook.com/SEOSuperstar Ryan Burnsworth

    Good article.
    I agree on the paid links. It is just too risky.
    Branded links to great keyword-rich (search-friendly) pages are going to be the way to go. Since Google takes each link as a vote, many votes to a keyword-rich page will raise its authority for those keywords.
    Thanks for the post.

  • http://twitter.com/albarce Alexandra Barcelona

    Thanks for the great advice. There have been so many articles about the Penguin/Panda updates, it’s nice to see one that give tangible advice for what you should do with your SEO efforts now that they have launched. The content creation tips are definitely useful!

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=738199271 Joseph Sanchez

    I agree completely. Great article.

  • http://www.facebook.com/marcuscudd Marcus Cudd

    It would appear that Google is targeting ALL SEOs, not just white-hat or black-hat. I contend that Google prefers there were no SEOs, but rather they make all the decisions about rank without us meddling kids ;)

  • Josef Holm

    Great read!

    IMHO paid links are still totally fine, the big questions is just where you buy them. There is no way for Google to know the difference between a paid link and a free link IF that paid link is embedded in quality content on a quality blog, with own IP and most importantly social signals & author authority.I don’t think blog networks are dead at all, just the way they were operated. It’s much more complex and expensive these days but it still works better than anything else that I know of.

  • http://www.sabrinasabino.com/ Sabrina Sabino

    At this point, I no longer know the difference between white hat and black hat seo.  It almost feels like this: if you’re doing anything to promote your link anywhere then this is unnatural linkbuilding.  Even if your aim is to get your link out there to as many sites as possible and your intention is not to spam but to promote, you might be in for some Google slapping.

  • http://eileenlonergan.com Eileen Lonergan

    http://www.expand2web.com/blog/copywriting-infographic/ this is a great info graphic on hiring copywriters for all of us who are going to go down the content route.

  • Etienne Clergue

    All the recent updates are creating so much confusion, and if we as SEOs are puzzled, just imagine how our clients must feel. 
    Of course algorithm updates are necessary, but that often?
    Great article with enough positivity to keep us going!

  • allstate1

    Very true and suggestion

  • http://twitter.com/victor_willemse victor willemse

    Kerry, you made me a believer again :) Great read..

    My opinion on all the updates, Google wants more then just PPC if your SEO is doing well Google ain’t make any money on you…

  • guruswamy kethineni

    Great Article,

    Yes, Webmasters should be careful with paid links

  • Satya Narayan

    Hi, In “Diversify your paid link portfolio” section, your suggestion to get links from no PR sites contradicts my thought. As we know there are several negative reasons for a website to have no PR and it’s a sign of spam or ban. When Google PR is not affixed to a website it represents very low quality site and often spam.

    So, are you suggesting you readers to create back link form a spam or banned site?
    However all other points look very effective in the current context?Thanks

  • http://twitter.com/keliedotcom Keli E

    Micro Site??  That’s just a glorified doorway page (with more than one page).  We’re getting away from the concept of creating just ONE good site!  Anytime you go out of your way to employ a tactic FOR the search engines and not the end use has ALWAYS been questionable (spammy) to me.  If people just created a high quality site to begin with, they wouldn’t have penguins and pandas in their bath water :)

    To date, thousands of sites, not one banned or penalized,
    Keli

  • macseotips

    Three things really stand out to me as I analyze SERPs after this update. Content tagged with Google Authorship code really is getting preferential – and highly visible treatment. Not just on Page one, but further down as well.

    Google’s own Blogspot blogs are more prominent – even if the content doesn’t warrant it, ditto for YouTube clips. They’re definitely favoring their own properties more and more.

    Lastly – and this is quite important – some of the horrible results and content on Page 1 are still filled with hideous spun content. Proof that Google lacks ANY decent algos to syntactically evaluate the TRUE ‘quality’ of a page’s content. No wonder we’re all being pushed to supposedly improve the quality of our pages – cuz Google clearly is weakest in this area.

    The saddest part about this Webspam update is its karmic shift from Rewarding – to a PUNISHMENT mentality. There’s just something uniquely NASTY about its intent that makes it different from other tweaks over the years.

  • Stephen

    @twitter-14832123:disqus  Exactly: improve the human user experience since people will be turned away by the spammy feel of a site faster than the Panda, Penguin or any other update.

    Search engines adjust their algorithms to serve their end users by recommending sites that people should like and want to share. If we too serve our visitors, the search engines need to recognize that and promote what they deem the most valuable results to remain competitive against the other engines.

    @Kerry: In the Content Creation section, are you suggesting we “must go faster”? :)

  • https://plus.google.com/u/0/111506395990228434496/about Stacey Cavanagh

    Super read.

    Definitely in agreement with the sentiment over exact match anchors! They’re effectively just a big flag… “woo hoo, Google! Check out my linkies!”

  • http://frasercain.com Fraser Cain

    I still think this is very risky advice. Google has said that they don’t want you to do any artificial linkbuilding at all. None. Don’t ask for a single link. All linkbuilding is blackhat.

    So your advice here is going to set people up for a future penalty. 

    Essentially, you’re saying “here’s how you can continue to manipulate the search results.”

    Just spend your time and effort on your own website, creating content that people love. 

  • seoservant

    Google has placed Amazon top for all PRODUCTS

    note: next to books Amazons next big search is “sex toys”

    they also own imdb.com which is number 1 for “xxx”
    on Google

    Unless Amazon has started a Blog, content, Facebook, twitter ect for “sex toys”
    along with “jewelry boxes” and every other product

    Face it – Google and Amazon where at the channeladvisor conference in Vegas days before the PENGUIN hit

    Amazon, Sears, eBay and all the channels went up and the mom small business went down.

    Google is no longer organic – they choose specifically who ranks where now.

    Amazon page 1 for all products
    Overstock
    Sears
    ect

    Amazon’s – imdb.com site also places page 1 for “mothers day” and “fathers day”
    the next 2 big shopping seasons to hit

    Amazon stock jumped $30 after PEGUIN release

    face it – Google is not organic and content, soc ect will not get anyone above the fold again.

    MY CHALLENGE: Google your product and see where Amazon, imdb.com, Overstock, Sears or Zappos posts

  • http://seoebooklab.blogspot.com/ Ram Babu SEO

    i think now SEO strategy needs more care to work on proper link building!

  • RedEvo

    Din’t agree with this. In civil law cases swing on the concept of what a reasonable person’s view would be.

    It seems reasonable to me that Google could, and indeed will have to, make these type of decisions with respect to the likelihood of links being metitricios or paid. A dangerous game to play.

  • RedEvo

    The idea this is driven by PPC is unrealistic. Without great websites there is no PPC. Without quality search results there is no PPC.

    This is all driven by Spam infested SERPS, it’s as simple as that.

    It will all shake down and settle down, it has to for Google to survive.

  • RedEvo

    I’m not sure how you conclude a £2000 link budget would create a pattern. If you are not buying links the number would fluctuate dramatically depending on the breaks you got during link discovery.

  • http://twitter.com/igl00FTW igl00

    actually this is good article. usually whitehats dont understand real link building, but not this time ;)

  • Eric Ridley

    Thanks for trying to demystify the situation. It’s so confusing right now, and many of us have no idea whose advice to trust.

  • PeckLorrie254

    Here are few tips by using which you can earn so much money in couple of days. In start you will face so many difficulties but later on you will get various ways to earn money over Internet. Everything takes some time to get to know, same the case with it, but we will tell you the kick-start way of earning through Internet which would be much more worthwhile for you. Last week I got a site, where you can kick a good start, Look this for further details.  http://earnusdathome.weebly.com/

  • Ronie Jauod

    Use http://duckduckgo.com/ to search.

    Email me if you need cheap but quality SEO Services. roniejauod [at] gmail dot com None of my sites was affected buy the latest google update.

  • pmargaret

    Hi Kerry. It’s really confusing how Google seems to be making lots of updates in the past few months. A lot of websites have had massive decrease in traffic and SERP rankings. Somehow, I have understood that Google wants everything to be natural and diverse. I do agree with all the points you have discussed here.

  • http://blogs.cutcompcosts.com/ Workers compensation rate

    The article is good as long as it helps getting me my position back in SERPs.
    Chris Harris

  • http://www.antonkoekemoer.com/ Anton Koekemoer

    Couldn’t agree more with this article and love how you used “Jurassic Park”.
    For years everyone (white hatters) has been talking about content, content, and once more, content. But how are you going to get your content noticed if you don’t build links to your content? Seems to me that the saying “Others have to like you first before Google will like you” is turned upside down.

  • http://www.meritorious.co.uk/ Michelle Crofts

    I think it’s is more that the less reputable ‘SEO companies’ out there still tend to promise a fixed number of links per month. Links that they can guarantee will be built or replaced to order and those of the most artificial type there is. Proper link building and/or natural link acquisition, you’re right, would typically not follow this pattern.

    A lot of clients I’ve spoken to in the past, especially those who are new to SEO, believe that a set number of links per month is best so they know ‘what they are paying for’ and can compare services. I guess it’s always nice to be able to measure something, and sadly those who are not in the industry may tend to believe all links have equal value.

  • http://www.meritorious.co.uk/ Michelle Crofts

     I’d say one of the ways is to publish your content on popular sites if possible and those that have a social aspect – this type of content will be found and shared fairly naturally if it suits the audience, serves a purpose and has some sort of hook in the headline. Of course, good sharable viral content is far easier to suggest than to create…

  • Sameer Sharma

    Thanks for sharing the great Article. I help me a lot… I deeply thank you for this..

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Ronald-G-Nixon/1042174097 Ronald G. Nixon

    Thank you for saying that. Amazon and the other big players seem to be exempt from the rules and manage to be on page 1 for just about every search. 

  • William Margita

     Also 3 of the 9 directors at Google are former Amazon

    L. John Doerr has served as a member of our board of directors since May 1999. John has been a General Partner of Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, a venture capital firm, since August 1980.  John was previously a director of Amazon.com, Inc.,

    Ann Mather has served as a member of our board of directors since November 2005. Ann has also been a member of the board of directors of: Glu Mobile Inc., a publisher of mobile games, since September 2005, and serves as chair of its Audit Committee; MGM Holdings Inc., a motion picture and television production and distribution company, since December 2010, and serves on its Compensation Committee; MoneyGram International, a global payment services company, since May 2010; and Netflix, Inc., an internet subscription service for movies and television shows, since July 2010, and serves on its Audit Committee. Ann was previously a director of Central European Media Enterprises Group, a developer and operator of national commercial television channels and stations in Central and Eastern Europe; Zappos.com, Inc., a privately held, online retailer, until it was acquired by Amazon.com, Inc.

    K. Ram Shriram has served as a member of our board of directors since September 1998. Ram has been a managing partner of Sherpalo Ventures, LLC, an angel venture investment company, since January 2000. From August 1998 to September 1999, Ram served as Vice President of Business Development at Amazon.com, Inc.

  • William Margita

     Also 3 of the 9 directors at Google are former Amazon

    L. John Doerr has served as a member of our board of directors since May 1999. John has been a General Partner of Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, a venture capital firm, since August 1980.  John was previously a director of Amazon.com, Inc.,

    Ann Mather has served as a member of our board of directors since November 2005. Ann has also been a member of the board of directors of: Glu Mobile Inc., a publisher of mobile games, since September 2005, and serves as chair of its Audit Committee; MGM Holdings Inc., a motion picture and television production and distribution company, since December 2010, and serves on its Compensation Committee; MoneyGram International, a global payment services company, since May 2010; and Netflix, Inc., an internet subscription service for movies and television shows, since July 2010, and serves on its Audit Committee. Ann was previously a director of Central European Media Enterprises Group, a developer and operator of national commercial television channels and stations in Central and Eastern Europe; Zappos.com, Inc., a privately held, online retailer, until it was acquired by Amazon.com, Inc.

    K. Ram Shriram has served as a member of our board of directors since September 1998. Ram has been a managing partner of Sherpalo Ventures, LLC, an angel venture investment company, since January 2000. From August 1998 to September 1999, Ram served as Vice President of Business Development at Amazon.com, Inc.

  • William Margita

    This is a follow up to previous comment about “Why Does Amazon Rank #1 for all Products”

    3 of the 9 directors at Google are former Amazon

    L. John Doerr has served as a member of our board of directors since
    May 1999. John has been a General Partner of Kleiner Perkins Caufield
    & Byers, a venture capital firm, since August 1980.  John was
    previously a director of Amazon.com, Inc.,

    Ann Mather has served as a member of our board of directors since
    November 2005. Ann has also been a member of the board of directors of:
    Glu Mobile Inc., a publisher of mobile games, since September 2005, and
    serves as chair of its Audit Committee; MGM Holdings Inc., a motion
    picture and television production and distribution company, since
    December 2010, and serves on its Compensation Committee; MoneyGram
    International, a global payment services company, since May 2010; and
    Netflix, Inc., an internet subscription service for movies and
    television shows, since July 2010, and serves on its Audit Committee.
    Ann was previously a director of Central European Media Enterprises
    Group, a developer and operator of national commercial television
    channels and stations in Central and Eastern Europe; Zappos.com, Inc., a privately held, online retailer, until it was acquired by Amazon.com, Inc.

    K. Ram Shriram has served as a member of our board of directors since
    September 1998. Ram has been a managing partner of Sherpalo Ventures,
    LLC, an angel venture investment company, since January 2000. From
    August 1998 to September 1999, Ram served as Vice President of Business
    Development at Amazon.com, Inc.
     

  • http://twitter.com/publicphoto Public Domain Photos

    Google is a private company, so the rules are made by them … we can not change anything. For google outweigh the financial nature of the business in relation to their earnings.
    If Google would be like wikipedia and search engine as open source, alternative search would certainly be different.

    Opensource going so well for OS and software utilities, why not go for a search engine ?
    Over 30 years there will be no google, nothing is eternal, but do we can expect 30 years? :)
    Quantum computing power and huge storage capacity will provide an opportunity to create a search engine at a prices of thousands (or tens of thousands) of times smaller than today.

    btw, why google+ result is not framed in google image-search ? 
    Because is “Big G” and can afford anything, even to steal traffic and images !

  • http://www.SmartInternetBusinessSolutions.co.uk/ Online Marketing Birmingham

    I’d say There’s no need to worry about your SEO strategy,as long as you prefer Quality over Quantity.

 

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